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Learn about Projects for New Jersey Infrastructure Bank, including Borough of Somerville "Green Seam", RVRSA Trunk Sewer Replacement, and Tuckerton Borough Heron Road Water Main Replacement.

Somerville Borough Clean Water Project

Borough of Somerville "Green Seam"

The Borough of Somerville recently completed clean water improvements that are being partially funded with approximately $3.5 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. 75% of the engineering and building costs were funded by a grant from DEP's Hazardous Discharge and Site Remediation Fund. The remainder of allowable project costs were financed by a loan from the NJ Water Bank. Total savings from the Water Bank portion of the project are estimated to be $505,976 over the 14-year term of the loan or 15% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 40 direct construction jobs.  

The Borough rehabilitated and restored ten acres of a stream corridor and existing wetland area within a former 47.4-acre landfill. The Borough constructed a stream lining system known as the "Green Seam" wetland corridor in the area of an unnamed tributary that forms the  natural stream corridor between the two former landfill lobes. The restoration area is located above a moderately wooded area in Somerville identified as the South Triangle. The final cover of the Green Seam Corridor prevents polluted runoff and leachate from entering the stream and will become part of a contiguous cap that will cover the entire landfill. The Borough has also proposed a plan to set aside approximately 41 acres for rehabilitation as passive stormwater mitigation and nonpoint source pollution management.  

Dennis Sullivan, Mayor of Somerville Borough extolled the environmental benefits of the project: "This remediation will prevent contaminated water from entering the Raritan River and the restoration of adjacent wetlands will provide a public resource for recreation and educational activities. We are gratified to provide so many benefits at such cost-effective prices." 

This project was designed by Geosyntec Consultants and constructed by Tomco Construction, Inc. 

Picture courtesy of Somerville Borough

Rockaway Valley Regional Sewerage Authority Clean Water Project

RVRSA Trunk Sewer Replacement

The Rockaway Valley Regional Sewerage Authority (RVRSA) recently completed sewer system improvements that are being funded with approximately $2.3 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $746,265 over the 30-year term of the loan or 33% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 26 direct construction jobs.  

Sanitary wastewater flows through a collection system made up of a series of sewer lines, chambers and pumping stations. Each member town and customer of RVRSA maintains their own collection system. These sewer lines then flow into the RVRSA main "trunk", which flows via gravity to the RVRSA treatment plant. In 2011, Hurricane Irene caused a portion of the trunk line that crossed the Rockaway River, to wash away. This project included the construction of a replacement sewer on Morris Avenue, a pumping station on Monroe Street, a force main from the new pumping station and a small grinder pump station and force main in Harrison Street. In addition, the downstream section of the Jersey City Trunk Sewer was rehabilitated and relined with cured-in-place lining. 

According to Michael Puzio, Mayor of Rockaway Township, one of the Authority's major customers, "The health of the Rockaway river is an important asset to all communities in the Rockaway area. We recognize the RVRSA for its commitment to the Rockaway River Watershed Cabinet as an active member, participating in local watershed management activities. This project is a salient example of the Authority operating under best practices, dedicated to achieving the highest treatment standards efficiently and protecting the environment while saving our ratepayers money over time." 

This project was designed by Mott MacDonald, managed by Kleinfelder East and constructed by Tomar Construction. 

Pictures courtesy of RVRSA

Tuckerton Borough Clean Water Project

Tuckerton Borough Heron Road Water Main Replacement

The Borough of Tuckerton recently completed wastewater treatment plant improvements that are being funded with approximately $810,860 in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $677,595 over the 30-year term of the loan or 84% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 10 direct construction jobs.  

Tuckerton Borough replaced 3,165 linear feet of existing Asbestos-Cement 4-inch deteriorated water mains with new 8-inch PVC pipe on Heron road. Existing water service laterals were also replaced, including curb stops, meters, meter pits and fire hydrants. The larger pipe size addressed fire safety concerns since large volumes of water were draining from hydrants in areas using undersized watermains. The pipes were also deteriorating, causing leaks and water loss to the Borough.  

"Our commitment to clean water and reliable service requires that we make critical infrastructure improvements," said Susan Marshall, Mayor of Tuckerton Borough. "In addition to enhancing the efficiency of our service, these upgrades contribute to fire safety and the economic vitality of our community by passing the savings from the New Jersey Water Bank Financing Program on to our residents." 

This project was designed by Owen Little & Associates and constructed by P&A Construction, Inc.

Picture is courtesy of Owen Little & Associates.

Atlantic County Utilities Authority Clean Water Project

Atlantic County Utilities Authority Flood Protection Program

The Atlantic County Utilities Authority (ACUA) recently completed wastewater treatment plant improvements that are being funded with $296,150 in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. This project qualified for principal forgiveness totaling $55,711 as it improved resilience for future storms. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $95,926 over the 13-year term of the loan or 32% of the total project cost. 

Atlantic County Utilities Authority (ACUA) owns and operates a regional wastewater treatment plant (Plant) located on a parcel northwest of Atlantic City, known as City Island. The plant has been in operation since 1978.  Due to the location of City Island, and the coastal region it serves, hurricanes and tidal conditions can potentially cause loss of power and inundation of the plant and pump stations. The project entailed the purchase of 10,800 linear feet of removable  and reusable flood protection barrier to be deployed around the pumping stations and the plant in preparation for an impending storm. The provision of portable flood protection measures will protect the facilities from severe weather events similar to Super Storm Sandy and provide resilience in case of future storms. 

According to Frank Gilliam, Mayor of Atlantic City, one of the Authority's major customers, "This is a smart project with a big impact. For very little money, the ACUA has protected its treatment plant from future storms and qualified for principal forgiveness from the NJ Water Bank in the process. This project is an excellent example of the ACUA's commitment to better manage our waste water, improve resiliency and reduce risks to public health and the environment while saving our rate payers money over time."  

The flood barriers were installed by US Flood Control Corp.  

Picture courtesy of ACUA

Atlantic County Utilities Authority Clean Water Project

Atlantic County Utilities Authority Sewer Sludge Incinerator Upgrade

The Atlantic County Utilities Authority (ACUA)recently completed wastewater treatment plant improvements that are being funded with approximately $3.5 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $694,883 over the 20-year term of the loan or 20% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 42 direct construction jobs.  

Two sewer sludge incinerators and associated equipment were upgraded at the City Island Wastewater Treatment Plant. The smaller of the two units is only operational during shutdowns of the larger unit. A pneumatic transport system was installed to reduce fugitive ash emissions and modifications were made to the incinerator and ash loading building. Other modifications included the replacement of the four ashburners in the backup incinerator with low NOx burners and replacement of sixteen burner control boxes.  

According to Frank Gilliam, Mayor of Atlantic City, one of the Authority's major customers, "This project allowed the ACUA to meet new EPA emission requirements reducing air pollution for the community. The ACUA has shown consistent dedication to upgrading its facility for increased efficiency and environmental benefits at the lowest cost to ratepayers." 

This project was managed by GHD Inc. and constructed by Quad Construction.

Pictures courtesy of ACUA

Kearny MUA Clean Water Project

Kearny Municipal Utilities Authority Pump Station Repairs

The Kearny Municipal Utilities Authority (KMUA) recently completed pump station improvements that are being funded with approximately $1.5 million in a SAIL loan from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. The total construction cost of the project was $4,942,398 and qualified for FEMA funding as the facility was damaged during Superstorm Sandy. The Water Bank provided SAIL loan funds in advance of FEMA reimbursements and assisted the KMUA by overseeing compliance with FEMA requirements. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $273,488 over the 20-year term of the loan, or 19% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 18 direct construction jobs.  

The repairs provided mitigation measures to increase the resilience of the pumping stations and replaced some of the equipment that was at the end of its useful life.  

The project consisted of repairs to the Kearny Point and Harrison Avenue Pumping Stations including a new standby power generator and above-grade fuel storage tank with three-day capacity. New dry-pit submersible pumps were installed with a new pump header system, and associated work at the Kearny Point Pump Station. A new bar screen and a flood barrier were installed at the Harrison Avenue Pump Station.  

According to Alberto Santos, Mayor of Kearny, "We value our MUA and their dedication to operate as efficiently as possible. This project improved operations at both pump stations, enhancing resilience and ensuring reliable wastewater conveyance. The more we stay on top of maintenance and planning for the future, the more we can pass savings on to our residents." 

This project was designed by Mott MacDonald, LLC and constructed by Coppola Services, Inc.

Picture courtesy of Kearny MUA.

Long Beach Township Drinking Water Project

Long Beach Township Pump Room Reconstruction

Long Beach Township recently completed Water Plant improvements that are being funded with approximately $1.2 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. This project qualified for a NANO loan that offered principal forgiveness totaling $500,000 as it addressed the needs of a community with a population not greater than 10,000. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $913,491 over the 30-year term of the loan or 71% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 14 direct construction jobs.  

The Brant Beach Water Treatment Plant, built approximately 50 years ago without any flood protection, was severely damaged by Superstorm Sandy. The Plant's water quality and capacity were impacted by flood water, which shut down the Plant's pumps and electrical components necessary to operate the system. This drinking water project included the demolition and reconstruction of existing Well Building No. 3 and the Generator Room to meet FEMA's 500-year flood elevation requirement, as well as the installation of new equipment.  

According to Joseph H. Mancini, Mayor of Long Beach Township, "This project brought the pump station into compliance with FEMA Flood Zone Regulations and the Safe Drinking Water Act. The facility is now protected against flooding and sustained power loss, improving resiliency for residents in the case of future storms. We took advantage of Principal Forgiveness from the NJ Water Bank and a USDA Grant for a combined savings of $1,000,000. For these reasons, this project has been nominated for an AQUARIUS award presented by the EPA. We are hopeful because this project represents improved protection and hefty savings for our ratepayers over time." 

This project was designed by Owen, Little & Associates and Constructed by TKT Construction Company, Inc. 

Pictures courtesy of Owen, Little & Associates.

Somerset Raritan Valley Sewerage Authority Clean Water Project

Somerset Raritan Valley SA Air Pollution Control System Upgrades

The Somerset Raritan Valley Sewerage Authority (SRVSA) recently completed wastewater treatment plant improvements that are being funded with approximately $11.4 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $3.7 million over the 30-year term of the loan or 32% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 137 direct construction jobs.  

The SRVSA has two sewage sludge incinerators. The project  included  the  rehabilitation of Incinerator No. 2, constructed in 1990, and an upgrade of the air pollution control system. The rehabilitation of Incinerator No. 2 consisted of new primary, secondary and tertiary heat exchangers, a new mercury scrubber system and new associated instrumentation and electrical systems. Incinerator No. 1 was non-operational while repairs to Incinerator No. 2 were underway and will be re-evaluated for repair now that Incinerator No. 2 is back up and running. 

Recent USEPA regulations set strict limits for nine pollutants under section 129 of the Clean Air Act. To meet these new low emission limits, the SRVSA had to significantly upgrade their air pollution control equipment. The replacement of antiquated equipment enabled the SRVSA to continue reliable operation of the sludge incinerator facilities, comply with federal regulations and improve the efficiency at the plant. 

Dennis Sullivan, Mayor of Somerville Borough, one of the SRVSA's major customers, applauded the project: "Somerville is the county seat of Somerset County and has been a member of the SRVSA since its creation.  This infrastructure project will enable Somerville Borough to successfully grow and ensure that demands on the Borough's sanitary sewer system are fully satisfied.  Furthermore, this project will assist Somerville in maintaining compliance with all State and Local Laws." 

The project was designed by CDM Smith and constructed by Iron Hills Construction, Inc and Hankin Environmental Systems.

Picture courtesy of SRVSA

Burlington Township Clean Water Project

Burlington Township Sanitary Sewer Main Rehabilitation

The Township of Burlington recently completed Sanitary Sewer Main improvements that are being funded with approximately $720,152 in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $147,804 over the 20-year term of the loan or 21% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 9 direct construction jobs.  
 

The project included the rehabilitation of approximately 14,200 linear feet of existing 8-inch diameter sanitary sewer mains and approximately 1,300 linear feet of 10-inch diameter sanitary sewer mains located in the Springside section of the Township. Prospect, Bunting, Gerome, and Ellis Avenue sewer mains were also rehabilitated along with ninety manholes.The sewer mains were largely constructed of asbestos cement piping (ACP), and in danger of collapse. Cured—in—place piping (CIPP) was installed utilizing trenchless technology (slip lining) to clean and reline the mains to reestablish optimal flow conditions and prevent failure of the system. 

According to Brian J. Carlin, Mayor of Burlington Township, "Maintaining our water, sewer and roadway infrastructure is critical to delivering affordable services to our residents. Investing in our sewer system improvements promotes efficient cost-effective operations that greatly benefits the residents and businesses of Burlington Township. Through the use of the NJ Water Bank, we are able to ensure the stability of our infrastructure at a savings to our residents."  

This project was designed by the Burlington Township Engineering Department and constructed by North American Pipeline Services, LLC. 

Picture Courtesy of Burlington Township

New Jersey Water Bank receives award for their role in funding the Gloucester County Utilities Authority Wastewater Treatment Plant

The New Jersey Alliance for Action commemorated NJ's leading infrastructure projects on Wednesday, February 6th during a breakfast celebration at Forsgate Country Club in Monroe Township. Nineteen projects were presented with awards and many team members responsible for each project were present to receive the awards. Philip K. Beachem, President of New Jersey Alliance for Action opened the ceremony and presented details on each project which were wide-ranging and remarkable for varying reasons. One of the nineteen projects receiving an award was the , a project funded through the NJ Water Bank. Representatives responsible for the project include Robert Gillies, Senior Estimator for AP Construction Inc., William Coogan, Project Manager for CBI Services, LLC; Scott Lattimer for Clyde N. Lattimer & Son Construction Co., Inc.; William Cooper, Jr., Partner for Cooper Plumbing and Mechanical, LLC; John Vinci, Executive Director, Gloucester County Utilities Authority; James Helms, Project Manager for Pact Two, LLC; Steve Luttrell, Attorney for Parker McCay; Dennis Yoder, Remington & Vernick Engineers; Kenneth Hill, Senior Project Manager for Scalfo Electric Inc., and Dan Cosner, President, Southern New Jersey Building & Construction Trades Council. George Rolon, Project Manager of the I-Bank accepted the award on behalf of the NJ Water Bank for their role in funding the project.

Project Specifics: The project is being funded with approximately $41.6 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $20.6 million over the 30-year term of the loan or 50% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created approximately 500 direct construction jobs.

The bio-solids handling facility converts the sludge handling process from sludge incineration to anaerobic digestion with combined heat and power generation. The project includes the construction of an anaerobic digester, and a digested sludge storage tank. The existing grit removal system is being replaced and the tanks were modified to accommodate the new equipment. The project includes the installation of clarifier equipment, an algae sweep system and upgrades to the GCMUA's aeration system blowers which reduce energy consumption and perform more reliably with consistent dissolved oxygen control. As a result, the blowers mitigate potential upsets in the facility's biological process.

Picture courtesy of Alliance for Action

Tuckerton Borough Clean Water Project

Tuckerton Borough Sanitary Sewer Main Replacement

The Borough of Tuckerton recently completed sanitary sewer main improvements that are being funded with approximately $1.3 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $432,962 over the 30-year term of the loan or 32% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 16 direct construction jobs.  

The project replaced over 3,000 linear feet of 6-inch asbestos cement pipe sewer mains with 8-inch PVC piping. The existing mains were showing signs of cracks, breaks, and settlement which contributed to increased costs due to infiltration. Laterals, cleanouts, and manholes were also replaced. Sanitary sewerage is conveyed by gravity sewer mains to various pump stations where the sewage is pumped within force mains to the Ocean County Utility Authority's gravity mains and pump stations.      

According to Mayor Susan R. Marshall, "Tuckerton Borough is committed to investing in our utility infrastructure. This project represents an obvious fix to resolve infiltration issues. In addition to enhancing the integrity of our service, these improvements reflect a dedication to efficiency. Our ratepayers also benefit by borrowing through the Water Bank which saves them money through the life of the financing." 

This project was designed by Owen Little and Associates and Constructed by P&A Construction, Inc. 

Pictures courtesy of Owen Little & Associates

City of Newark Drinking Water Project

The City of Newark launches its Lead Service Line Replacement Program with a Ground-Breaking Ceremony!

The City of Newark held an official groundbreaking ceremony on Wednesday, March 13th to announce construction of its $75 million Lead Service Line (LSL) Replacement program. Phase I of the project, totaling over $12 million is being funded by the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate financing program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. The City is working to minimize lead exposure from drinking water plumbing in this first phase of the project by replacing 1,500 residential service lines made with lead materials. Newark resident, Kristin Burks-Mullings explained to the audience that she and her husband had gotten quotes to replace their LSL's totaling approximately $8,000. When she found out about the City's program offering to replace all known LSL's in the City at a reduced cost of up to $1,000, she and her husband jumped on the proposal with much appreciation.  

"Today's groundbreaking represents our commitment to delivering real, lasting solutions for the people of Newark by replacing decades-old residential lead service lines across our city," said Mayor Baraka. "As an older, urban community, Newark has outdated lead service lines, and we look forward to modernizing our infrastructure and reducing risk for Newark's families through the LSL Replacement Program." 

Andre Frye, an employee of Roman Asphalt Corporation and resident of Newark, thanked those present for the bid on the job. As an employee of a relatively small company, Frye indicated that he was gratified for the chance to work on a job that, in many cases, would have gone to a larger company.  

Newark is the largest city in the state of New Jersey, supplying potable water to a population of approximately 280,000. Located in the center of New Jersey's Gateway Region, the City has been a major regional commerce and transportation hub since the 19th century. The City provides approximately 80 million gallons per day of potable water to a population of over 300,000 customers within the City and its surrounding communities through a large, complex system.  
 

Photo: From left to right: Newark Resident, Kristin Burks-Mullings, Newark Mayor Ras J. Baraka and DEP Commissioner, Catherine McCabe.

Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority Clean Water Project

Bayshore RSA Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) Improvements

The Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) recently completed wastewater improvements that are being funded with approximately $9.9 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $2,409,074 over the 20-year term of the loan or 24% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 117 direct construction jobs.  

According to Robert Fischer, Executive Director, of the BRSA, "Utilizing the I-Bank's low-rate funding for the restoration and mitigation of damage caused by Superstorm Sandy, allowed us to, not only restore our 24-acre facility campus, but also to protect it from future storms of greater strength. With the savings we were able to realize for our ratepayers through the Water Bank, it just didn't make sense to seek funding elsewhere." 

The project included repairs and improvements to BRSA's Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) in Union Beach that was completely flooded by Superstorm Sandy. The work entailed repair of the damages and mitigation measures to protect against wastewater service disruption in case of future coastal storms. In addition, updates to the incinerators at the WPCP brought the plant into compliance with new federal air emissions regulations.  

Specific details of the work included restoration and mitigation of the administration building, the odor control building, primary sludge pump stations #1 and #2, the return sludge pump station, the hypochlorite building and the fire water pump station. The main pump station and sludge return building and pump station were repaired as well as the Laboratory and Office Building. The Niro incinerator system was repaired and upgraded. A flood wall was also constructed to protect against future flood damage. The facility is now protected against storms of greater size and intensity than Superstorm Sandy. 

According to Monmouth County Freeholder Patrick  Impreveduto," This project will benefit all of the communities served by the BRSA. It will protect against wastewater service disruption and lower the risk of future flooding impacts, improving resiliency to the plant. This project is an example of the BRSA‘s commitment to  future stability, quality service, a healthy environment and fiscal responsibility." 

Components of the project were designed by R3M Engineering, PS&S, LLC, and Hazen & Sawyer, P.C. The projects were constructed by Shorelands Construction, Inc., Northeast Remsco Construction, Inc., and Stone Hill Contracting Co., Inc.

Pictures courtesy of Bayshore RSA

North Wildwood City Clean Water Project

North Wildwood City Utility Reconstruction

North Wildwood City recently completed a utility reconstruction project that is being funded with approximately $16.5 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. This project qualified for principal forgiveness totaling $3,103,960 as it addressed damage from Superstorm Sandy and improved resilience for future storms. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project is estimated to be $9.7 million, over the 30-year term of the loan or 59% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 198 direct construction jobs.  

The project included the repair and rehabilitation of the existing sanitary and storm sewer systems, which suffered premature failure due to the massive inflow of stormwater during Superstorm Sandy. The deteriorated sanitary sewer mains and the sewer laterals to the curb line were replaced with more resilient PVC pipes. In addition, solid brass caps were installed in the new sewer cleanouts to prevent stormwater from entering them in the future. New sanitary manholes were installed and fitted with drain pans and water-tight gasket seals. This project increased the capacity of the system preventing the deteriorated sewer mains from discharging sewage into coastal waters.  

According to Patrick Rosenello, Mayor of North Wildwood City, "This project enhances the efficiency of the utility and improves resilience in the case of future storms, while protecting the environment from potential sewage discharge. These advantages, combined with shrewd financial management, will benefit our ratepayers by providing efficient service and a staggering financial savings of almost 60% of the project costs." 

This project was designed by Van Note Harvey Associates and constructed by Perna Finnegan, Inc., Garden State General Contracting, and Asphalt Paving Systems, Inc.

Pictures courtesy of Van Note Harvey.

Orange City Roadway Improvemnts

The City of Orange Receives $9.9 Million in Low-Interest-Rate Funding from the State to Perform City-Wide Roadway Improvements

CITY OF ORANGE, NJ - The City of Orange announced that it recently received a $9.9 million low-interest rate loan from the NJ Transportation Bank to construct roadway improvements on a number of streets throughout the city.  

The City of Orange worked closely with Pennoni Associates, Inc., a multidisciplinary consulting engineering firm, to complete and submit the loan application. Funds received from the Transportation Bank, a joint low-rate loan program of DOT and the NJ Infrastructure Bank, will allow the City to improve more than 35,000 feet (6.7 miles) on 31 different roadways.  The roadway improvements will include paving, utility upgrades, street tree planting, as well as the rehabilitation of driveways, sidewalks, and curbs. Safety upgrades include intersection improvements, high-visibility crosswalks, bicycle-safe grates, and ADA-compliant curb ramps. Construction is expected to commence in late May with the majority of work to be completed during the coming summer months to minimize the impact to residents and businesses throughout the city.  

Pennoni Associates, Inc. is providing ongoing engineering design and construction management services to the City throughout the project.  
According to Marty Mayes, the City's Director of Public Works, "This project presents an exciting opportunity for the City, makes an important contribution to the administration's larger initiative to revitalize the City's infrastructure and serves the community at the most efficient cost." 

According to Marty Mayes, the City's Director of Public Works, "This project presents an exciting opportunity for the City, makes an important contribution to the administration's larger initiative to revitalize the City's infrastructure and serves the community at the most efficient cost." 

Picture courtesy of the City of Orange

From left to right: David Zimmer (NJ I-Bank), Stephanie Monahan (NJCF), Carmen Rodriguez and Jeffrey Nash (Camden County Freeholders), Olivia Glenn (DEP), Andy Kricun (CCMUA), Michael Hogan ( SJLWT), and Frank McLaughlin (DEP)

Cramer Hill Nature Preserve opens in East Camden

A cheerful energy was evident at the ceremony commemorating yet another collaborative triumph in Camden County at the Cramer Hill Nature Preserve. The preserve is located on the border of Camden City and Pennsauken Township. The combined efforts of Camden County, the Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority (CCMUA), the NJ Infrastructure Bank (NJ I-Bank), the NJ Department of Protection (DEP), the NJ Conservation Foundation (NJCF), and the South Jersey Land & Water Trust (SJLWT), have resulted in an urban oasis with access to the Camden City waterfront, the third in a string of green spaces for the residents of the community to enjoy. A team of Camden's underprivileged youth joined in the efforts as well. They are members of PowerCorps, a subsidiary of AmeriCorps, that puts 30 at risk youth to work maintaining the city's green space. To date, members of this collaboration take credit for Phoenix Park, Gateway Park and now the Cramer Hill Nature Preserve, all riverfront parks. Several of the speakers at the ceremony referenced Monsignor Doyle from the Sacred Heart Parish, who was not present at the commemoration, but has been committed to creating open space, and often observed the importance of connecting a community to its waterfront.  

The 35-acre site across from Petty Island took years to clean up. The work, supervised by Michael Hogan, Habitat Assessment and Volunteer Coordinator of the SJLWT, included the removal of over 600 tires, eight to nine dumpsters filled with garbage, ten burnt out cars and the evacuation of a homeless encampment. The Preserve now includes a tidal pond which is home to a beaver lodge and attracts other fauna including Great Blue Herons, Bald Eagles, Red Tailed Hawks, Black & White Warblers, Egrets, Yellow Warblers, turkey and deer. "Decades of research has shown that the more open space that is available to a community, the better that place is to live and work," said Freeholder Jeff Nash, liaison to the Camden County Parks Department. "There is a lush green space in the middle of this urban neighborhood, that the community hasn't been able to access for nearly 30 years. This park restores the public's right to enjoy their land and protect it from illegal activity." 

David Zimmer, Executive Director of the NJ I-Bank, a partner in the low-rate Water Bank Program with the DEP, and which provided financing for the project, noted that, "This project represents the third and final leg of a $2.6 million project. Of the $500,000 spent on this specific component, the CCMUA saved over $230,000 or 46% by borrowing through the Water Bank as opposed to private financing. Putting it another way, the community gets to enjoy this beautiful park at 54 cents on the dollar."  

The site was formerly home to a sewage treatment plant operated by the CCMUA for more than 40 years. The site has been off-limits since the plant closed in the 1990's and was targeted by illegal dumping and littering for more than 15 years when the CCMUA began clean-up efforts. "We have turned this space from a nuisance into an asset," said Andy Kricun, Executive Director of the CCMUA, reflecting on the tidal fish pond in place of the shuttered waste water treatment plant. "This park is also part of our greening initiative throughout the city, which not only provides open space, but also represents a critical anti-flooding program boasting 60 rain gardens and 125 greened acres diverting over 100 million gallons of water from the City's combined sewer system." The Park has dawn to dusk hours equipped with cameras to deter continued littering, which has been an ongoing concern. Petty Island, directly across from the site is also being preserved to expand outdoor educational opportunities involving the preserve's diverse plant and wildlife. Once completed, the two sites will provide unprecedented access to natural resources in one of the state's most densely populated urban zones. 

The combination of green space within Camden's urban environment created a unique opportunity for its underprivileged youth through the PowerCorps program. PowerCorps provides health care, and child care when needed, for youth between 18 and 25 years of age. After six months on the rotation maintaining Camden's green space, the participants are rewarded with scholarship to college. 

The Cramer Hill Nature Preserve will continue to be owned and operated by the CCMUA. The Camden County Board of Freeholders and the CCMUA are committed to expanding the County and the City's open space and, with members of the collaborative, will continue to work to enhance the community's quality of life through this public/private partnership. By providing parks like Cramer Hill, the collaborative is reducing flooding, protecting the environment and providing learning opportunities in a natural setting for local residents at the lowest financing costs.

Mantua MUA Drinking Water Project

Mantua MUA Drinking Water Improvements

The Mantua MUA recently completed drinking water improvements that are being funded with approximately $2.7 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $864,374 over the 20-year term of the loan or 32% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 26 direct construction jobs.  

Improvements included the construction of a new well and new well building with the required electrical, mechanical and control infrastructure including an emergency generator and an upgraded SCADA system. In addition, the project included the rehabilitation of a 0.5-million gallon water storage tower. Based on the most recent inspection reports, the coating on the tank had reached the end of its lifecycle. Improvements to the water storage tank included blasting, spot grinding, filling, welding and painting the tank. The booster pump was also replaced, and a generator was installed with a transfer switch. The replacement of the water tower coating will protect local water supply quality from disturbances related to chemical leaching and rusty water. The project will keep the municipal infrastructure in good operating condition and facilitate continuing efforts to provide effective water supply and fire protection for residents, businesses and industry served by the MUA.  

According to  Peter Scirrotto, Mayor of Mantua Township, "Our commitment to clean water and reliable service requires that we make critical infrastructure improvements. In addition to enhancing the integrity of our service, these upgrades contribute to the overall efficiency of our water distribution system and the economic vitality of our township by passing the savings on to our ratepayers." 

"Maintaining the current infrastructure will protect local water quality to ensure a consistent water supply." said Robert Damminger, Gloucester County Freeholder.  "In addition, these improvements will provide more precise monitoring of water quality parameters." 

This project was designed by Sickles & Associates. The Well project was constructed by Level-1 Construction, Inc., and the Standpipe was painted by G Meyer Group. The Booster Station Improvements were completed by Clyde N. Lattimer & Son Construction Company, Inc.

Pictures courtesy of Sickles & Associates

Northwest Bergen County Utilities Authority Clean Water Project

Northwest Bergen County Utilities Authority Wastewater Treatment Plant Improvements

The Northwest Bergen County Utility Authority (NBCUA) recently completed Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) improvements that are being funded with approximately $2.3 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $732,151 over the 20-year term of the loan or 32% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 28 direct construction jobs.  

The project included the replacement of two aeration system blowers with new energy efficient units, the installation of a main control panel for the aeration system, repair of air distribution piping in the aeration tanks, installation of five new energy efficient waste activated sludge pumps with variable frequency drives and the replacement of all associated piping to connect to existing pipe headers. The replacement of the old, inefficient and high-energy consuming equipment will improve the plant's handling of solids removal which is integral to the overall treatment process and quality of the effluent discharged to the Ho-Ho-Kus Brook. 

According to James Rotundo, Executive Director of the NBCUA, "These improvements will enhance the efficiency, reliability and resiliency of our WWTP at the lowest possible cost to the ratepayers. In addition, the environmental benefits and efficiency measures gained from the project will benefit the community far into the future." 

This project was designed by T&M Associates and constructed by Coppola Services, Inc. 

Pictures courtesy of T&M Associates

Clinton Town Clean Water Project

Clinton Town New Water Treatment Facility

The Town of Clinton recently constructed a new water treatment facility with approximately $1.7 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $661,848, over the 30-year term of the loan or 40% of the total project construction cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 20 direct construction jobs.  

The chamber and below-grade treatment equipment containing Well #4 were replaced with a single story water treatment facility at the existing Deer Hill Road Location. As this site is in the  floodplain, the existing well casing was extended above flood elevation to meet resiliency requirements. Well #4 was furnished with a new submersible pump and a pitless adapter that discharges to the new treatment facility. The treatment facility included a videographic recorder, a well level indicator, remote communications for SCADA and a tablet chlorinator.  

The project also included the renovation of Well #7 with new fixtures including a submersible well pump, SCADA communication equipment, and a  back-up natural gas generator. The existing 100,000-gallon water storage tank was modified with a mixing system, cathodic protection and a manway hatch. Lastly, Well #14, which had been faulty and inoperative for several years, was decommissioned as per NJDEP regulations. 

According to Clinton's Mayor, Janice Kovach, "This project ensures the health and safety of our residents through the reliable delivery of potable water. The improved operation and maintenance of Well #4 will also reduce costs for our customers. "In addition," Kovach added, "the natural gas generator will provide emergency power to enhance our resiliency in the event of future storms." 

This project was designed by Suburban Consulting Engineers, Inc. and constructed by DeMaio Electric Co., Inc. 

Pictures courtesy of Suburban Consulting.

Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission Clean Water Project

Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission Waste Pump Expansion Project

The Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission (PVSC) recently completed an expansion project that is being funded with $909,975 in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $284,797 over the 30-year term of the loan or 31% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 11 direct construction jobs.  

The project's plant-wide improvements increase PVSC's wet weather treatment capacity to reduce the volume of Combined Sewer Outfall (CSO) discharges. The Waste Pump Expansion is one component of the overall project and included the installation of new pumps, valves, piping, flow meters, process control sampling and monitoring equipment, as well as electrical improvements, to accommodate the new pumps. Hydraulics and pump operations were also upgraded.  

Nine of PVSC's municipalities have CSO discharges to area waterways including the Passaic, Hackensack and Hudson Rivers, as well as Newark Bay.  
According to Gregory Tramontozzi, Executive Director of the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission, "This project is an example of PVSC's collaboration with the State of New Jersey to assist with CSO issues. Borrowing through the I-Bank has benefited our contributing communities by reducing risks to public health and the environment while providing savings to our ratepayers over time." 

This project was designed by CDM Smith and constructed by Coppola Services, Inc. 

Picture courtesy of PVSC.

Middlesex Water Company Drinking Water Project

Middlesex Water Company Water Main Rehabilitation

The Middlesex Water Company recently completed drinking water improvements that are being funded with approximately $9.5 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $4.5 Million over the 30-year term of the loan or 47% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 114 direct construction jobs.  

The project included the replacement of approximately 5.6 miles of cast iron mains with cement mortar lined ductile iron pipe to inhibit the corrosive effects on the piping systems. More than 550 service lines were also replaced and  a similar number of meter pits and associated valves and appurtenances were installed. The project area encompasses the vicinities of Madison Drive, Hamilton Boulevard, and Samson, Lane and Maple Avenues within the Borough of South Plainfield.  

According to Matthew Anesh, Mayor of the Borough of South Plainfield, "The Middlesex Water Company is committed to investing in our utility infrastructure. In addition to enhancing the integrity of their service, these upgrades contribute to the overall sustainability and economic vitality of the municipalities they serve. This project reflects a commitment to efficiency which benefits their ratepayers by saving them money over time." 

This project was designed by in-house engineering and Gannet Fleming. It was constructed by J.F. Kiely Construction Company. 

Picture courtesy of Middlesex Water Company

NJ American Water Drinking Water Project

NJ American Water Low Lift Pumping Station Improvements

New Jersey American Water recently completed pump station improvements at their Raritan Millstone Water Treatment Plant (RMWTP) and expansion of their Sunset Road Water Treatment Plant (SRWTP) with approximately $24 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $11.3 Million over the 30-year term of the loan or 47% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 253 direct construction jobs.  

The improvements at the Low Lift Pumping Station (LLPS) took place at the RMWTP in Bridgewater Township. The project included the replacement of existing pumps and motors and the upgrade of the station's electrical and instrumentation systems. The project also included the expansion of the existing operator control room and related ancillary work. This project improved the efficiency and reliability of the LLPS and related operations.   
The SRWTP expansion took place in Lakewood Township and included the installation of new structures including Well House no. 17 and a building addition on the existing treatment facility. Well no.17 was constructed to provide increased capacity from 2.2 MGD to 3.9MGD to satisfy expected peak flow conditions. Upgrades to the facility's electrical equipment were also completed and will improve the efficiency and reliability of treatment facility. New low lift pumps, high service pumps and backwash pumps were also replaced. Two new pressure filters were installed and the existing three pressure filters were rehabilitated as part of the project. Upgrades to the existing chemical system were also completed and the existing building structure's roof was replaced.  

"These projects represent a critical investment for the company in support of its commitment to provide customers with safe and reliable water and wastewater services," stated Deborah Degillio, President of New Jersey American Water, "These projects help maintain compliance with the Safe Drinking Water Act, increase efficiency and improve reliability, at the lowest possible cost to our ratepayers saving almost 50% of the total project costs." 

The LLPS project was designed by Gannett Fleming and is being constructed by Allied Construction Group. The SRWTP project was designed and completed by CDM Smith and was constructed by Allied Construction. 

Pictures courtesy of NJ American Water.

Pennington Borough Drinking Water Project

Pennington Borough Water Main Replacement

The Borough of Pennington recently completed water main replacements that are being funded with $631,180 in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. This project qualified for 50% principal forgiveness totaling $315,590 as it services a population of 500 residents or fewer. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project is estimated to be $599,978, over the 30-year term of the loan or 95% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 7.5 direct construction jobs.

The project included the replacement of 4" and 6" water mains located along East Curlis Avenue and Weidel Drive with 1,765 linear feet of new 8" DIP water mains. The current water mains are approaching their anticipated useful life and replacement is necessary to avoid future water main failures.

"We are very proud of Pennington's small water company", said Mayor Joe Lawver. "Through careful management, we are able to provide our customers with extremely high-quality service at very competitive rates. Our partnership with the Water Bank allows us to implement our long-term capital plan so that we are ready for the future. Water Bank funding packages allow us to pass cost savings on to our ratepayers."

This project was designed by Van Note Harvey Associates and constructed by John Garcia Construction Co., Inc.

Picture courtesy of Van Note Harvey Associates

Cape May City Well Replacement

Cape May City Well Replacement. Community Receives $1,687,303 in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $671,184.

February-19-2019

The City of Cape May recently completed drinking water improvements that are being funded with approximately $1.7 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $671,184 over the 30-year term of the loan or 40% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 20 direct construction jobs.

The project included the drilling of new Well No. 8 which will act as a back-up supply to the City’s existing water treatment plant. Permanent pumping equipment was installed, and the existing well house was demolished and replaced with a larger one. The well was designed to produce approximately 1,000 gallons per minute of brackish water which was connected onsite to the existing Well No. 7 transmission main and conveyed to the City’s treatment plant.

Cape May City’s Mayor, Clarence F. Lear III, applauded the project stating “We are proud of our Reverse Osmosis Water treatment Facility which removes salt from our water wells to produce potable drinking water. We remain committed to investing in our utility infrastructure. The service we provide is essential to public health, fire protection, quality of life and economic growth in our community which includes the City of Cape May, the Boroughs of West Cape May and Cape May Point and the US Coast Guard Training Center. In addition to enhancing the integrity of our service, these upgrades contribute to the overall efficiency of our water distribution system and the economic vitality of our community by passing the savings earned through the NJ Water Bank on to our rate payers.”

This project was designed by Remington Vernick & Walberg Engineers and constructed by Marino, Industrial Systems & Services.

Picturecourtesy of Cape May City and Remingon Vernick & Walberg Engineers

Hightstown Borough Drinking Water Project

Hightstown Borough Ultraviolet Disinfection System

**Hightstown Borough Ultraviolet Disinfection System. **
Community receives $1.3 Million in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated savings to rate payers of $526,545.

February-11-2019

The Borough of Hightstown recently completed wastewater treatment plant improvements that are being funded with approximately $1.3 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $526,545 over the 30-year term of the loan or 40% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 15 direct construction jobs.

The project replaced the Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant’s (AWWTP) existing chlorination, dichlorination, and sand filter systems with new state-of-the-art Ultra Violet (UV) Disinfection and Disk Filter systems in half the space.

The project removed and replaced two large sand filters with two UV disinfection units and two disk filters within the same footprint. The installation of two units for each process ensures constant disinfection of wastewater when one unit requires maintenance. The new disk filters and UV Disinfection system are easier to maintain and eliminate the need for hazardous chemicals such as chlorine. The replacement of the chlorine disinfection system with UV eliminated the discharge of chlorine produced oxidants (CPOs), specifically high levels of Bromodichloromethane. The elimination of chlorine gas and sodium hydroxide creates a safer work environment and a healthier effluent for plant and wildlife in Rocky Brook into which the AWWTP ultimately discharges.

The new Disk Filters and UV Disinfection systems are also more reliable for ensuring safe effluent quality, easier to operate and maintain, and more efficient in the process. The project received a second-place award for the Project of the Year from the NJ Society of Municipal Engineers (NJSME) for work designed for a municipality with a population under 20,000.

Lawrence D. Quattrone, Mayor of Hightstown Borough, declared the project a success. “Our water department is dedicated to managing our wastewater and reducing risks to public health. The UV disinfection system represents an excellent upgrade to our system as it kills bacteria, viruses and yeasts without impairing the taste or odor of the water. This project is a great example of our water department implementing best practices at the lowest prices which we can pass on to our residents.”

This project was designed by Roberts Engineering Group and constructed by Quad Construction.

Picture courtesy of Roberts Engineering Group.

City of Newark Queen Ditch Restoration Project

Community Receives $6 Million in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated savings to rate payers of $5.7 million.

February-5-2019

The City of Newark recently completed green infrastructure improvements that are being funded with approximately $6 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-interest funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. This project qualified for principal forgiveness totaling $2,646,039 as it addressed CSO overflows in Newark and improved resilience for future storms. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $5,737,269 over the 20-year term of the loan or 95% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 72 direct construction jobs.

Drivers in the City of Newark have become accustomed to flooding in certain areas during rain events causing recurring property damage and, in some instances, leaving motorists stranded. In an effort to reduce the frequency and magnitude of local street flooding, the City upgraded and improved drainage facilities in the the Queen Ditch section of the City. The project included the installation of a precast concrete box culvert and the installation of a netting facility that prevents street debris and litter from entering the City’s waterways. The project also included dredging the Queen Ditch to its original depth and restoring an important wetland habitat in the center of a highly developed industrial area. An in-line floatables collection system was also constructed as well as a headwall with a tide gate, and a stone scour pad.

According to Newark Mayor Ras J. Baraka, “This project eliminates the blockage of the main outlet sewer from the Queen District diversion chamber. In addition, it restricts the overflow of combined sewage during wet weather periods that result in frequent surface flooding. This investment is an example of our collaboration with the State of New Jersey to solve flooding issues, protect public health, and benefit our taxpayers through the money they will save over time.”

This project was designed by CDM Smith and constructed by Rencor Construction Service, Ltd.

Jersey City MUA Green Infrastructure Project

Community receives $6.7 Million in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated savings to rate payers of $3,431,821.

January-30-2019

The Jersey City Municipal Utilities Authority (JCMUA) recently completed stormwater improvements that are being funded with approximately $6.6 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. This project qualified for principal forgiveness totaling $1,328,974 as it addressed damage from Superstorm Sandy and improved resilience for future storms. Another component of the project addressed CSO issues with green infrastructure, qualifying for additional principal forgiveness funds. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project is estimated to be $3.4 million, over the 20-year term of the loan or 51% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 79 direct construction jobs.

The project included the installation of emergency generators at the east and west side pump stations, their connection to the electrical systems, concrete foundations, storm drains, water main and hydrants, paving, and removal of oil storage tanks. The green infrastructure portion of the project included the replacement of deteriorating sidewalk with pervious sidewalks to recharge groundwater. Two existing downspouts were directed into six pre-cast downspout planter boxes equipped with perforated underdrains that discharge to approximately 1,760 square feet of pervious concrete sidewalk that intercept, treat and filter stormwater runoff from the rooftop. Approximately 8,540 square feet of porous asphalt parking spaces were installed to intercept, treat and filter stormwater runoff from the parking lot. Two rain gardens were installed in front of the JCMUA building to capture stormwater runoff from the adjacent parking lot. Three rain gardens were installed along NJ Route 440 to intercept, treat and filter stormwater runoff from part of the roadway.

Steven M. Fulop, Mayor of Jersey City applauded the project noting, “This is a smart project. For very little money, we have diverted water from our combined sewer system with green engineering techniques and qualified for principal forgiveness in the process. The result is reduced stormwater overflow, improved resiliency and savings of over 50% in the long run. This project is an excellent example of our commitment to better manage our waste water, improve resiliency in case of future storms and reduce risks to public health and the environment. This project accomplished all that at an affordable price that will save our rate payers money over time.”

This project was designed by Remington Vernick Engineers and the Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resource Program. It was constructed by Carbo Constructors Corp. and Montana Construction Corps, Inc.

Gloucester County Utilities Authority Wastewater Treatment Plant Improvements

Authority Receives $41.6 Million in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated savings to rate payers of $20,695,995.

January-22-2019

The Gloucester County Utilities Authority (GCUA)recently completed stormwater improvements that are being funded with approximately $41.6 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $20.6 million over the 30-year term of the loan or 50% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 499 direct construction jobs.

The bio-solids handling facility converted the sludge handling process from sludge incineration to anaerobic digestion with combined heat and power generation. The project included the construction of an anaerobic digester, an egg-shaped digester, and a digested sludge storage tank. The existing grit removal system was replaced and the tanks were modified to accommodate the new equipment. The project also included the installation of clarifier equipment, an algae sweep system and upgrades to the GCUA’s aeration system blowers which reduce energy consumption and perform more reliably with consistent dissolved oxygen control. As a result, the blowers mitigate potential upsets in the facility’s biological process.

Robert M. Damminger, Freeholder of Gloucester County, commended the project, noting “This is a large project and a valuable undertaking for all of the 16 municipalities served by the GCUA. The generation of combined heat and power, in addition to other wastewater plant improvements, will enhance energy efficiency to better support the anaerobic digestion process. This project will greatly benefit our rate payers by providing efficient service and financial savings over time.”

Paul Medany, Mayor of Deptford Township, one of the utility’s customers, added “Using the byproducts of the GCUA to provide green energy for our citizens is a solution that is both environmentally friendly and cost effective, a big win for all of us.”

This project was designed by Remington Vernick Engineers and constructed by CBI Services, Clyde N. Lattimer & Sons, and Pact Two, LLC.

Atlantic County UA Resiliency Project

Authority Receives $4,852,159 in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $2,877,359.

January-17-2019

The Atlantic County Utilities Authority recently completed resiliency improvements that are being funded with approximately $4.8 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. This project qualified for principal forgiveness totaling $1,213,040 as it addressed damage from Superstorm Sandy and improved resilience for future storms. In addition, this project qualified for Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR) funds. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project is estimated to be $2,877,359 million over the 20-year term of the loan or 59% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 58 direct construction jobs.

The project provides necessary energy power upgrades and adds resiliency to address deficiencies brought on by Superstorm Sandy. Upgrades include a roll-off truck with a roll-off skid mounted diesel refueling system, emergency power installations, portable diesel power module generators, six trailer mounted portable pumps and the replacement of a 15,000-gallon storage tank. In addition, a permanent sump was constructed within the facility for emptying stormwater from the building.

According to Frank Gilliam, Mayor of Atlantic City, one of the Utility’s major customers, “The ACUA used their expertise to improve resiliency in case of future storms which benefits all of the municipalities within their service area. This project will provide enhanced quality of life for our residents combined with smart money management reflected by the astounding 60% savings of the total project costs. This project, funded through the Water Bank, is an excellent example of how communities can implement water infrastructure improvements and save money in the long run.“

The project was designed by ACUA in-house staff and constructed by Phillips Brothers Electrical and TTI Environmental.

Hillsborough Sewer Extension

Community Receives $1,152,723 in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $323,455.

January-8-2019

Hillsborough Township recently completed stormwater improvements that are being funded with approximately $1.2 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $323,455 over the 20-year term of the loan or 28% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 14 direct construction jobs.

The project included the construction of approximately 3,400 linear feet (LF) of 8-inch diameter sanitary sewer, 750 LF of 1 ½ inch polyethylene force main, 16 manholes, as well as a number of stormwater inlets and laterals to serve existing homes from where the wastewater is conveyed to the Somerset Raritan Valley Sewerage Authority (SRVSA) for treatment. The provision of a sanitary sewer collection and conveyance system to these homes, alleviated previously malfunctioning septic systems.

Gloria McCauley, Mayor of Hillsborough Township commended the project noting, “This project is an example of our commitment to better manage our waste water, reducing risks to public health and the environment. This project accomplished all that at an affordable price that will save our rate payers money over time.”

This project was designed by Maser Consulting and constructed by OTS NJ.

Paterson City Clean Water Project

Paterson City Solids/Floatables Control Facility

The City of Paterson is constructing clean water improvements that are being funded with approximately $9 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $3,891,361 over the 20-year term of the loan or 43% of the total project cost. In addition, this project is creating an estimated 108 direct construction jobs.

The project includes the construction of solid/floatable control facilities to eliminate and properly dispose of solids that are too large to pass through the city's 31 permitted combined sewer overflows. A total of four different outfall sites are being constructed on three combined sewer overflow (CSO) sites containing a combination of mechanical screening and netting facilities. A static bar screen is being constructed on an additional site.

According to André Sayegh, Mayor of Paterson City, "This project is an example of our commitment to improve energy efficiency, better manage our waste water and reduce risks to public health and the environment. This project is accomplishing all that at the lowest possible cost through the NJ I-Bank and will save our rate payers money over time."

This project was designed by the Alaimo Group and constructed by Tomar Construction, LLC.

Picture courtesy of the Alaimo Group.

Carteret Stormwater Efficiency Project

Community Receives $13.2 Million in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $7.8 million.

The Borough of Carteret recently completed stormwater efficiency improvements that are being funded with a combination of State and Federal financing. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) provided a $1.04 million grant for Open Space acquisition through its Green Acres Program. The stormwater management components of the project are being funded with approximately $13.2 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank. Several components of this project qualified for principal forgiveness totaling $2.48 million as they addressed damage from Superstorm Sandy and improved resilience for future storms. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $7.8 million over the 30-year term of the loan or close to 60% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 146 direct construction jobs.

Rahway City WTP Filter System Upgrade

Community Receives $12.9 Million in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $3,967,158

The City of Rahway recently completed stormwater improvements that are being funded with approximately $12.9 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $4 million over the 23-year term of the loan or 30% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 154 direct construction jobs.

The project consisted of improvements to the City’s water treatment plant and construction of a new interconnection and pipeline with Middlesex Water Company. The system’s existing gravity filters were replaced with a membrane treatment system and housed in a new treatment building. The project also included the construction of approximately 1,610 linear feet of new piping, and a new, pre-fabricated sanitary pump station consisting of two submersible pumps. The liner for the onsite residual holding pond was removed and replaced with a new HDPE liner and the SCADA system was upgraded.

NJ American Water Flood Gate Replacement and Stabilization

Company Receives $27,201,503 in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $14,864,529.

NJ American Water recently completed stormwater improvements to the Raritan Millstone Water Treatment Plant (RMWTP) that are being funded with approximately $27.2 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. This project qualified for the maximum amount of principal forgiveness, totaling $2,121,919 as it addressed damage from previous storms and improved resilience for future storms. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project is estimated to be $14.8 million over the 30-year term of the loan or 55% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 326 direct construction jobs.

South Monmouth Regional Sewerage Authority Clean Water Project

EPA Recognizes South Monmouth Regional Sewerage Authority for Excellence and Innovation in Clean Water Infrastructure

**New York, NY **(November 8, 2018) — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognized 30 clean water infrastructure projects for excellence and innovation within the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) program. Honored projects include large wastewater infrastructure projects to small decentralized and agriculture projects.South Monmouth, New Jersey Regional Sewerage Authority was recognized for its Pump Station Resiliency Initiative.

"The Clean Water State Revolving Fund plays an integral role in advancing the President's infrastructure agenda, providing communities with low-interest loans so that they can modernize aging infrastructure, create local jobs, and better protect public health and the environment," said EPA Office of Water Assistant Administrator Dave Ross. **"The scale and complexity of the 2018 PISCES recognized projects represent the determination, coordination, and creativity our partners put forth to achieve their water quality goals." **

The CWSRF is a federal EPA-state partnership that provides communities a permanent, independent source of low-cost financing for a wide range of water quality infrastructure projects. Over the past 31 years, CWSRF programs have provided more than $132 billion in financing for water quality infrastructure.

EPA's Performance and Innovation in the SRF Creating Environmental Success (PISCES) program celebrates innovation demonstrated by CWSRF programs and assistance recipients. Thirty projects by state or local governments, public utilities, and private entities were recognized by the 2018 PISCES program:

Exceptional Project

Delaware: City of Wilmington - Renewable Energy and Biosolids Facility
The City of Wilmington's wastewater treatment facility received a $36 million CWSRF loan to construct a renewable energy and biosolids facility for its treatment plant. This new facility captures previously flared methane gas from the plant's anaerobic digester and gas from a nearby landfill and uses it to generate four megawatts of electricity.

• **Kansas: Dodge City Biogas Reuse to Motor Fuel Project **
The Dodge City South Wastewater Treatment Plant developed a reuse project to clean and pressurize its excess biogas into a high-quality natural gas that can be sold on the market as motor vehicle fuel. The methane fuel produced is expected to have an annual production amount equivalent to 3.5 million gallons of gasoline.

New Jersey: South Monmouth Regional Sewerage Authority - Pump Station Resiliency Initiative
Along with FEMA assistance, CWSRF funds were used to build three resilient pump stations that service several coastal communities that have recently experienced extreme weather events. Two of these pump stations are fully operational mobile units that can be disconnected during a severe storm and hauled to a safe location and the third pump station replaced an older station that was in a 100-year flood zone.

Oregon: City of Prineville - Crooked River Wetlands Complex
The City of Prineville used CWSRF funding to design and construct the 120-acre Crooked River Wetlands Complex, which will help meet the effluent limits in the City's National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) wastewater permit. The Wetlands Complex has miles of trails open for public use and an outdoor classroom used by local schools. 

Texas: Wichita Falls - Permanent Reuse Project
The City of Wichita Falls is using a $33.5 million CWSRF green project reserve loan with over $252,000 of principal forgiveness to build a permanent reuse project that will deliver indirect potable reuse water from the River Road Wastewater Treatment Plant to Arrowhead Lake. This permanent reuse project will help the City meet Texas Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (TPDES) discharge requirements and will provide a long-term solution that will assist the City in meeting their source water needs. 

Honorable Mention

California: San Francisco Public Utilities Commission - Lake Merced Green Infrastructure
Colorado: City of Durango - Santa Rita Water Reclamation Facility
Florida: Cocoa Beach - Minuteman Causeway Stormwater/Streetscape Improvements
Idaho: City of Nampa – Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrade
Kentucky: Lincoln County Sanitation District - Junction City to Hustonville Sewer Project 
Maine: Lewiston-Auburn Water Pollution Control Authority - Anaerobic Digestion & Cogeneration Units
Massachusetts: Town of Grafton - Wastewater Treatment Plant Improvements
Ohio: Avon Lake – Lateral Loan Program
Oklahoma: Oklahoma City Water Utilities Trust - Atoka Reservoir Dam Rehabilitation
Pennsylvania: City of Reading - Fritz Island Solids and Liquids Treatment Plant Upgrade  

Recognized Project

Alaska: City of Kodiak – Compost Facility
Alabama: City of Cullman - Wastewater Treatment Plant Improvements
Georgia: Peachtree City - Lake Peachtree Dam Spillway
Louisiana: City of West Monroe - West Monroe Solar Panel Farm
Maryland: City of Cumberland - Combined Sewer Overflow Storage Facility
Michigan: City of East Lansing - Headworks Upgrades and Outfall Retrofit into a Relief Interceptor
Minnesota: City of Afton - Stormwater Green Infrastructure and Advanced Wastewater Treatment
Missouri: City of Liberty - Design-Build Wastewater Treatment Facility
New Mexico: Village of Cuba - Solids Handling and Effluent Reuse
Rhode Island: City of Newport - Wellington Avenue CSO Treatment Facility Upgrade
South Carolina: Renewable Water Resources - Reedy River Basin Sewer Tunnel
Vermont: Town of Waterbury - Wastewater Treatment Facility Upgrade
Virginia: Harrisonburg-Rockingham Regional Sewer Authority - Biogas Recovery and Reuse Project 
Washington: City of Bellingham - Squalicum Creek Water Quality and Biotic Integrity Improvements
West Virginia: Town of Pennsboro - Wastewater System Improvement Project

Learn more about each of the 2018 PISCES recognized projects at https://www.epa.gov/cwsrf/pisces.

Picture courtesy of South Monmouth Regional Sewerage Authority

Saddle Brook Township Drinking Water Project

Saddle Brook Township Water Distribution Improvements

Saddle Brook Township Water Distribution Improvements. Community Receives $1,309,660 in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $327,603.

The Township of Saddle Brook recently completed drinking water distribution improvements that are being funded with approximately $1.3 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Total savings for this project, including interest cost savings, are estimated to be $327,603, over the 20-year term of the loan or 25% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 15 direct construction jobs. 

The project involved the replacement of approximately 3,477 linear feet of water mains ranging in size from 6-inches to 10-inches in diameter and 3,120 linear feet of associated service connections. The affected areas include Fifth, North Fifth, Sixth, Ninth and Capitol Streets; Hillside and Grace Avenues; Route 46; and Outwater and Rosol Lanes. 

"Our commitment to clean water and reliable service requires that we make critical infrastructure improvements on an ongoing and timely basis," said Robert White, Mayor of Saddle Brook Township. "In addition to enhancing the integrity of our service, these upgrades contribute to the overall efficiency of our water distribution system and the economic vitality of our township by passing savings on to our ratepayers." 

This project was designed by Remington Vernick & Arango and constructed by Reivax Contracting.

Pictures courtesy of Remington Vernick & Arango.

Ventnor City Clean Water Project

Ventnor City Bulk Head Replacements

Ventnor City Bulk Head Replacement. Community Receives $1,311,000 in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $574,562.

Ventnor City recently completed a bulkhead replacement project that is being funded with approximately $1.3 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Several components of this project qualified for principal forgiveness totaling $246,624 as they addressed damage from Superstorm Sandy and improved resilience for future storms. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $574,562 over the 20-year term of the loan or 44% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 15 direct construction jobs.  

The project included the replacement of sections of bulkheads throughout the City that were damaged due to Superstorm Sandy. The bulkheads were installed on Sacramento, Derby & Winchester Avenues, Lilly Park, Vassar Square and Ventnor Garden Plaza. The project was designed to protect public infrastructure and private investments from impacts caused by stormwater flooding and mitigate against future damage to streets, homes, water systems and other utilities. The project site is a well-established neighborhood that has endured frequent flooding and significant impacts from Superstorm Sandy.  

According to Beth Holzman, Mayor of Ventnor City, "The replacement of the damaged bulkheads will significantly improve the conditions of the surrounding environment as well as water quality in the City. The more we stay on top of maintenance and resiliency planning, the better prepared we will be to avoid costly damage in case of future storms. By protecting our infrastructure, we ensure uninterrupted service, protect our environment and save money in the long run." 

This project was designed by Remington, Vernick & Walberg, managed by the City Engineer & constructed by Walters Marine Construction. 

Pictures  Courtesy of  Ventnor City.

Town of Hammonton Clean Water Project

Town of Hammonton Stormwater Improvements.

Town of Hammonton Stormwater Improvements. Community Receives $2,735,872 in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $661,848.

The Town of Hammonton recently completed stormwater improvements that are being funded with approximately $2.7 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $661,848 over the 20-year term of the loan or 24% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 26 direct construction jobs.

The project area contained undersized and leaking water mains and house connections as well as sediment-laden and broken storm sewers that caused flooding at various intersections and contributed to the deterioration of inlet structures, sanitary sewer piping and manhole junctions.

The project included the replacement of approximately 2,500 linear feet of sanitary sewer mains and stormwater piping along Valley Avenue and Broadway. The vitrified clay sewer mains were replaced with PVC piping, the concrete metal piping storm sewers were replaced with reinforced concrete piping, ductile iron piping and perforated high density polyethylene piping. Also, approximately 39 catch basins/inlets were installed, reconstructed and/or replaced.  

Steve DiDonato, Mayor of the Town of Hammonton, praised the project noting, "This project contributed to significant water conservation by reducing peak loads on the Town's wastewater treatment plant and eliminated cross system contamination risks. Critical infrastructure has been upgraded in a cost-effective manner to maintain the environmental integrity of the sanitary and storm sewer system."  

This project was designed, managed and inspected by ARH Associates and constructed by Mathis Construction Co., Inc. 

Pictures courtesy of ARH Associates

Little Egg Harbor MUA Water Main Replacement

Authority Receives $2,183,781 in Water Bank Loans

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $886,747

The Little Egg Harbor Municipal Utilities Authority (LEHMUA) recently completed a water main replacement project that is being funded with $2.2 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project is estimated to be $886,747 over the 30-year term of the loan or 40% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 25 direct construction jobs.

The project included the replacement of the existing aging water main along Twin Lakes Boulevard and a small section on Lake Champlain Drive. The project also included the installation of approximately 2.9 miles of new polyvinyl chloride (PVC) water main pipes, 22 fire hydrants, 200 water service connections and 62 gate valves. In addition, 38 new wet tap connections were installed.

Earl Sutton, Executive Director of the LEHMUA, commented: "The Authority was able to complete this project on time and within budget. This is only the beginning. By upgrading our infrastructure using the highest quality American-made products, we will continue to provide our customers with quality water exceeding all Federal and State standards. This project is one example of the Authority's commitment to improving our aging infrastructure to contain future costs, while limiting any impact on rates.  

The project was managed by Remington and Vernick Engineers and constructed by MSP Construction Corp. 

Pictures courtesy of Little Egg Harbor MUA.

Old Bridge MUA Clean Water Project

Old Bridge MUA Emergency Fuel Storage Facility.

The Old Bridge Municipal Utilities Authority recently completed construction of an emergency fuel storage facility with approximately $1.4 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. This project qualified for principal forgiveness totaling $261,519 as it addressed damage from Superstorm Sandy and improved resilience for future storms. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $597,496 over the 20-year term of the loan or 42% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 16 direct construction jobs.  

The project included the construction of an emergency fuel storage facility and the installation of two 10,000-gallon fuel storage tanks. Also included were fuel pumps and a shed for housing monitoring and safety equipment. 

According to Guy Donatelli, Executive Director of the Old Bridge MUA, "This project provides the Township with a guaranteed flow of safe drinking water, the quality of which exceeds State and Federal safety standards. It is an example of the MUA's efforts to upgrade and expand the system as needed to ensure a more than adequate water supply at the lowest possible costs. The new fuel storage facility and generator installed under this project at the Route 516 Maintenance Garage site will provide the Authority with added resiliency of our fuel supply and back-up generator power during future power outages due to adverse weather conditions and natural disasters such as Super Storm Sandy." 

This project was managed by CME Associates, and subcontracted by American Petroleum Equipment & Construction. 

Picture Courtesy of CME Associates

NJ American Water Drinking Water Project

New Jersey American Water Celebrates Completion of $37 Million Flood Protection Project at the Raritan-Millstone Water Treatment Plant

On Monday, New Jersey American Water celebrated the completion of a significant, long-term flood protection project at its Raritan-Millstone Water Treatment Plant with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on the grounds of the plant located at the confluence of the Raritan and Millstone Rivers. The $37 million project is part of a greater $65 million investment to help ensure protection from the increased risk of flooding during extreme weather events and maintain a sustainable water supply for more than 1 million people in the central New Jersey region. 

"Today is the result of countless hours of planning and 18 months of construction made possible by hundreds of professionals who came together to make our vision of protecting this facility a reality," said Deborah Degillio, President of New Jersey American Water. "We have fortified this critical infrastructure in order to provide clean, safe, reliable water service – not only to our customers in Central New Jersey who rely on us every day, but also to the millions of residents throughout the State whom we help during emergency situations." 

The Raritan-Millstone Water Treatment Plant, in Bridgewater Township, Somerset County, NJ, is New Jersey American Water's largest water production facility and a regional source of potable water supply for all or parts of seven counties in central New Jersey. As a Tier 1 New Jersey Office of Homeland Security & Preparedness facility, the Raritan-Millstone facility is also considered "critical infrastructure" by the federal Department of Homeland Security.  

The project was funded with approximately $27.2 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. This project qualified for the maximum amount of principal forgiveness, totaling $2,121,919 as it addressed damage from previous storms and improved resilience for future storms. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project is estimated to be $14.8 million over the 30-year term of the loan or 55% of the total project cost.

Mendham Township Clean Water Project

Mendham Township Wastewater Treatment Plant Facility Upgrade

The Mendham Township Sewerage Authority (MUA) recently completed wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) improvements that are being funded with approximately $3.7 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $1.5 million over the 30-year term of the loan or 40% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 44 direct construction jobs.  

The existing treatment system was in a state of hydraulic failure resulting in effluent leakage along the side slopes and ponding over the system. These conditions presented a risk to public health and the environment and dictated the need for system replacement. 

Further improvements to the WWTP included the conversion of the existing settler/thickener unit and sand filter to a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system. In addition, the chemical feed systems that use chlorine, alum, and sodium bisulfate were eliminated, resulting in cost savings that make the new system more affordable. The lower effluent disposal system is an essential component of the treatment facility and disposes approximately 2/3 of the treatment facility's total effluent volume.  

Warren Gisser, Deputy Mayor of Mendham Township commended the MUA noting, "We are pleased to have this project near completion. This facility upgrade has allowed us to better manage waste water and reduce risks to public health and the environment.  Our partnership with the New Jersey Water Bank has provided cost savings to our rate payers representing a significant savings in financing over time."  

This project was designed by OnSite Engineering and constructed by Coppola Services, Inc. 

Pictures courtesy of OnSite Engineering.

This post was published  on 9/25/18.

Little Egg Harbor Clean Water Project

Little Egg Harbor Sanitary Sewer System Rehab

The Little Egg Harbor Municipal Utilities Authority (MUA) recently completed sanitary sewer main and lateral improvements that are being funded with approximately $2.6 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $1 million over the 30-year term of the loan or 40% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 30 direct construction jobs. 

With its current infrastructure averaging over 50 years in service, the MUA had to perform several emergency repairs. The aging condition of the pipes necessitated caution to avoid further damages while repairs were being made. Superstorm Sandy caused a high infiltration of sand and surface water, as well as dips in the lines making cleaning and routine maintenance difficult. The project included the installation of 200 lateral sanitary sewer connections, 57 sanitary sewer manholes, and  approximately 12,450 linear feet of sanitary sewer mains. In addition, each cross-street intersection had approximately 60 linear feet of the sewer main extended for future replacement.  

Earl Sutton, Executive Director of the Little Egg Harbor MUA commented: "The MUA's large capital projects improvement program involving infrastructure replacements is just beginning. The MUA has a detailed program for the next twelve years and this project is just one example of our commitment to reduce health risks for the community, protect the environment, and convey wastewater efficiently, all while saving our rate payers money over time." 

This project was designed by Remington and Vernick  Engineers and constructed by M.S.P. Construction. 

Pictures courtesy of Little Egg Harbor MUA. 

Published on 9/18/2018

Stafford Township Drinking Water Project

Stafford Township Water Main Replacement

Stafford Township recently completed a water main replacement project that is being funded with approximately $2.4 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $598,922, over the 20-year term of the loan or 25% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 29 direct construction jobs.  

The project entailed upgrading the leaking and failing section of the Township's water distribution system in the lagoon portion of Beach Haven West. Approximately 7,890 linear feet of ductile iron pipe was replaced and proper pipe bedding, undermined during Superstorm Sandy, was installed to reduce the potential for pipe failure.  

According to Mayor John Spodofora, "Stafford Township is dedicated to saving as much water as possible to keep our quarterly usage bills at a minimum. We are committed to efficiency and motivated to improve resiliency in case of future storms. This project provides a more efficient water system and saves our ratepayers money in the long term. I give credit to our water department for their success in providing us with the safest and best tasting drinking water in the most cost-effective manner."  

This project was designed by CME Associates and constructed by P&A Construction, Inc. 

Pictures courtesy of CME Associates.

Published on 9/11/2018.

Atlantic County Utilities Authority Clean Water Project

Atlantic County Utilities Authority Bar Screen Installation

The Atlantic County Utilities Authority recently purchased equipment for the wastewater treatment plant that was funded with approximately $1.5 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $340,486, over the 20-year term of the loan or 22% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 18 direct construction jobs.  

Three mechanical bar screens had reached the end of their useful life and were compromising other equipment and processes. The bar screens were replaced to improve the screening process, and prevent grit from entering the downstream systems at the plant. In addition, six new automated sluice gates with electronic actuators were purchased as well as a self-contained compactor, a bag feed and a shaftless conveyor system. The enhanced screening operation will serve to overcome the impacts of extraordinary storm events. 

According to Frank Gilliam, Mayor of Atlantic City, one of the Utility's major customers "We salute the ACUA for enhancing our quality of life by protecting our land and water from pollution. This project is an example of the ACUA using new technology and innovative designs to provide the highest quality and cost effective environmental services." 

This project was designed, inspected and installed by ACUA personnel.  

Pictures courtesy of ACUA.
 

Published 9/4/2018

Trenton City Drinking Water Project

Trenton City Water Main Cleaning & Lining

The City of Trenton recently completed a water main cleaning and lining project that was funded with approximately $8.8 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $1.9 million, over the 20-year term of the loan or 22% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 106 direct construction jobs.  

The project involved cleaning and cement mortar lining of approximately 6 miles of existing water mains and replacement of 320 linear feet of watermains. The project also included the replacement of all inline valves and fittings on the unlined mains and fire hydrants within the system. Dead ends were eliminated with the construction of approximately 8,730 linear feet of cement lined ductile iron water main extensions to create loops in the distribution system. 

Trenton Mayor, W. Reed Gusciora, Esq., applauded the City Water Department for the project, noting, "This project is an excellent example of our Water Department's commitment to conserve and provide excellent drinking water while protecting the environment at the lowest possible cost to their customers."  

This project was designed by Mott MacDonald and constructed by Dewcon, Inc.  

Pictures courtesy of Mott MacDonald.

Published 8/28/2018.

Newark City Drinking Water Project

Newark City Water Distribution Main Rehabilitation

Newark City recently completed a drinking water project that was funded with approximately $16.8 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $6.7 million, over the 30-year term of the loan or 40% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 201 direct construction jobs.  

The project included the rehabilitation of over 11.5 linear miles of cast iron water distribution mains in the City. Pipes were internally cleaned either with pressurized water or drag lined, using an assembly of scrapers and tight-fitting squeegees through the lines with a power winch. Afterwards, a 1/8-inch thick cement-mortar lining was applied to the pipe interior. A portion of the mains were rehabilitated with the installation of a Cured-In-Place Pipe liner. Clearing the pipes eases the flow of water which reduces the pressure inside the pipes, greatly extending their useful life. The project also included replacement of approximately 175-line valves and 130 fire hydrants. 

Newark Mayor Ras Baraka commended the project adding that "Our water utility is dedicated to serving a continuous supply of safe, high quality water for the City of Newark. This project is an example of our efforts to protect our assets and maintain the integrity and security of our infrastructure. This investment will benefit our ratepayers through the water they drink and the money they will save over time."  

This project was designed by Mott MacDonald LLC and constructed by Mainlining America, LLC.  

Pictures courtesy of the City of Newark.

Published 8/21/2018

Side Bar Article by David Zimmer

The Public Needs to Support Proactive Officials

To comment on the current state of disrepair of the nation’s water infrastructure would be to add but another opinion stating the already obvious. What isn’t obvious is the paucity of public response to a dire situation. Read on.

Published 8/17/2018

Camden County MUA Clean Water Project

Camden County MUA Green Infrastructure, Sewer Reconstruction & Phoenix Park Phase II

The Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority recently completed stormwater control and water quality improvements that are being funded with approximately $5.4 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Several components of this project qualified for principal forgiveness totaling the maximum allowable amount of $1 million as they addressed damage from Superstorm Sandy and improved resilience for future storms. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $3.1 million, over the 30-year term of the loan or 58% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 63 direct construction jobs.  

The project included the construction of green infrastructure facilities throughout Camden including rain gardens, planter boxes, porous concrete sidewalks and porous pavement. Each project site will either decrease runoff or detain it for a sufficient time after potential storms to manage stormwater runoff from impervious areas and reduce pressure from the City's combined sewer system.  

Due to the hydraulic constraints from clogged or collapsed combined sewer pipes, overflows from some of the City's existing combined sewers were creating backups and flooding. This project prevents backups and overflows by restoring the capacity of the existing combined sewers.  Approximately 2,736 linear feet of existing deteriorated sections of combined sewer pipes were replaced with reinforced concrete or PVC pipes. 

The final component of this project creates Phase 2 of Phoenix Park. In order to rehabilitate the area of an abandoned factory, the CCMUA rehabilitated a portion of the property on Jefferson Avenue. Approximately 14,500 square feet of this area was excavated extending from the center of the site towards the Delaware River.  An existing concrete bulkhead and a pile of concrete weighing approximately 338 tons were removed from the river's edge and replaced with a new bulkhead. A stabilized access ramp was constructed at the water's edge near the overlook plaza, which was also constructed and included new trees. Approximately 9,000 square feet of wetlands were introduced near the water, and in the uplands area a native meadow was planted. Between the armored embankment and the native meadow, the CCMUA planted approximately 700 square feet of turf grass. 

According to Frank Moran, Mayor of Camden City, Andy Kricun, Executive Director of the CCMUA, and his staff are visionaries when it comes to stormwater management. They have already transformed the City by reducing flooding caused by combined sewer overflows and created open space for our residents. They continue to manage our stormwater problems with streamlined efficiency and effective best practices always with low-cost financing. This project reflects this strategy as it results in the protection of the health of our residents and the environment with a whopping $1 million principal forgiveness and saving almost 60% of the total project cost. I thank the CCMUA for their dedication to improving our City in an affordable manner."  

This project was designed by Johnson, Mirmiran & Thompson Engineers and constructed by the Ambient Group, T&T Commonwealth and Command Co., Inc. 

Pictures courtesy of Camden County MUA

Published 8/14/2018

Middletown Township Clean Water Project

The Township of Middletown SA Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrade

The Township of Middletown Sewerage Authority (TOMSA) recently  completed  wastewater  treatment plant  improvements that were funded with approximately $6.1 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Several components of this project qualified for principal forgiveness totaling $429,226 as they addressed damage from Superstorm Sandy and improved resilience for future storms. Including interest and cost savings, the total amount saved for this project is estimated to be $1.9 million over the 20-year term of the loan or 31% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 73 direct construction jobs.  

Improvements to the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) included the construction of a new building to house new switchgear and an emergency generator,  installation of sump pumps in basements that are susceptible to flooding, and installation of flood barriers on building windows and doorways. In addition, three clarifiers were rehabilitated.  

Improvements to the Raw Sludge building included the addition of a new electrical room, and replacement and relocation of the existing motor control center. The Sludge Thickener building roof was replaced and the Administration Building was modified to increase ADA accessibility. In addition, sanitary sewer aerial pipe crossings were repaired at three locations. 

According to Raymond Nierstedt, Executive Director of TOMSA, "This project represents the Authority's commitment to best practices as we have improved reliability and reduced maintenance costs. This project is an example of our efforts to maintain and upgrade our equipment for efficient operations which will, over time, pass savings on to our ratepayers."  

This project was designed by Maser Consulting and constructed by DLB Associates with electrical engineering provided by Sodon's Electric.    

Pictures courtesy of Maser Consulting 

Published 8/7/2018

Lavallette Water Tower

The Borough of Lavallette Water Storage Tank Rehabilitation

The Borough of Lavallette recently completed rehabilitation of a 500,000-gallon water storage tank with approximately $1.2 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $797,393, over the 20-year term of the loan or 69% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 13 direct construction jobs.  

The storage tank was last painted approximately 23 years ago and its protective coating had reached its anticipated life expectancy. The project included sandblasting the existing protective coatings after which the fluted column and steel elevated tank were repainted inside and out.  

"Our commitment to clean water and reliable service requires that we make critical infrastructure improvements," said Walter LaCicero, Mayor of Lavallette Borough. "In addition to enhancing the integrity of our service, this upgrade contributes to the overall quality of our drinking water and the economic vitality of the Borough by passing the savings from the financing program onto our ratepayers." 

This project was engineered by Mumford-Bjorkman, Inc. , constructed by O'Donnell, Stanton & Associates, Inc. , and painted by Brave Industrial Paint, LLC. 

Picture courtesy of O'Donnell, Stanton & Associates, Inc. 

Published 7/31/2018

Millville City Clean Water Project

Millville City Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrades Phase II

The City of Millville recently completed improvements to its wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) that are being funded with approximately $9.54 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $2.4 million, over the 20-year term of the loan or 24% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 114 direct construction jobs. 

Improvements to the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) included clarifier upgrades, construction of an influent pump station wet well, installation of return activated sludge pumps, a new strainer for the reclaimed water system, replacement of the existing belt filter presses with rotary presses, conversion of an abandoned sludge holding tank into a rotary press room and the installation of a track-mounted dumpster system. A disinfection system was installed and the electrical, instrumentation and SCADA Systems were upgraded. 

Michael Santiago, Mayor of Millville City, applauds the sewer utility stating, "They are operating a 5 million gallon per day wastewater treatment plant and serving a population of approximately 27,000 residents. The treated effluent surpasses all federal and state requirements set by their operating permit before it is discharged to the Maurice River. This project will greatly increase the efficiency of the WWTP system while saving our rate payers money in the long run. It is an example of the City's and the Utility's commitment to low costs, excellent service for our residents, and the protection of our environment." 

This project was designed by the City Millville Engineering office, managed by AECOM Technical Services and subcontracted by Worth & Company, Inc.

Pictures courtesy of W.E. Johnson Engineering.

Published 7/25/2018

Toms River MUA Clean Water Project

Toms River MUA Pipe & Lateral Rehabilitation

The Toms River Municipal Utilities Authority (TRMUA) recently completed pipe and lateral rehabilitation that is being funded with approximately $10.2 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the NJDEP and the NJIB. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $3 million, over the 20-year term of the loan or 30% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 122 direct construction jobs.  

The project included the rehabilitation of pipes and laterals within the TRMUA collection system. Approximately 12.7 linear miles of pipe and 870 laterals were exhibiting signs of infiltration and received cured-in-place lining. The Authority's sewer line inspection program indicated that 470 manholes were degraded due to hydrogen sulfide exposure and needed repair. In addition, seven pump stations were rehabilitated and updated with emergency generators.  

According to Thomas Kelaher, Mayor of Toms River, "This project reflects the TRMUA's methodical and professional dedication to provide an efficient collection system and protect the environment while saving our Town's ratepayers money over time." 

This project was designed by the TRMUA in-house engineering staff, Remington Vernick & Vena, The Alaimo Group, Birdsall Engineering and T&M Associates. It was constructed by All Jersey System Electrical Contractors and Coppola Services. 

Pictures courtesy of Remington Vernick & Vena Engineers

Sussex County MUA Landfill Expansion

Sussex County MUA Landfill Expansion

The Sussex County Municipal Utilities Authority (SCMUA) recently completed a landfill expansion that is being funded with approximately $8.8 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $2.2 million, over the 10-year term of the loan or 25% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 106 direct construction jobs.  

The landfill was constructed in 1990 has a current capacity of 1,018,000 cubic yards and receives solid waste from twenty-four municipalities in Sussex County. Improvements included an access road, installation of a mechanically stabilized earthen berm, an extended base liner, a drain system, a leachate side-riser system, a stormwater collection berm, and electrical work. The MSE berm ranges from 10 to 17 feet high, and is the first MSE berm to be approved and constructed in New Jersey at a Solid Waste Landfill.  Non-recyclable waste is sent to the landfill, placed in lifts and compacted in place. The expanded landfill will have gained an additional capacity of approximately 5,600,000 cubic yards. 

According to Carl Lazzaro, Sussex County Freeholder, "The Sussex   County MUA provides our residents and businesses with environmentally sound and cost effective solid waste disposal, wastewater treatment and recycling services. This project won an award from the Association of Environmental Authorities for Forward Thinking. It provides an innovative, cost effective and environmentally sound landfill expansion and provides sufficient revenue to support ongoing SCMUA solid waste operations. This project is an example of the SCMUA's dedication to deliver cutting edge waste disposal and protect the environment at the lowest possible cost to our community." 

This project was designed by Cornerstone Engineering Group who also performed resident engineering and inspection services during construction. SCS Engineers performed QA/QC inspection services. The project was constructed by a joint venture of A Servidone, Inc./B. Anthony Construction Corp./Barbella Construction Services, LLC.

Gloucester County Clean Water Project

Gloucester County Utilities Authority Wastewater Treatment Plant Improvements

The Gloucester County Utility Authority recently (GCUA) completed wastewater treatment plant improvements that are being funded with approximately $1.7 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $686,039, over the 30-year term of the loan or 40% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 20 direct construction jobs.     

Improvements to the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) included the installation of primary clarifier equipment, an alga sweep system and pumps for the East and West Primary Clarifiers located in the Gloucester County Utilities Authority Water Reclamation Facility located in West Deptford, NJ. 

Robert M. Damminger, Freeholder Director of Gloucester County applauds the project, stating that "The GCUA is dedicated to protecting public health and the environment. To do this, they operate an efficient facility and maintain their assets. This project is an example of their commitment to improve the water treatment process for optimal protection of our most precious resource at the lowest possible prices."  

This project was designed by Remington, Vernick Engineers, and constructed by Clyde N. Lattimer and Sons with Envirodyne Systems, Inc.  

Pictures courtesy of Remington Vernick Engineers.

Published 7/3/2018.

Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority Clean Water Project

Bayshore RSA Water Pollution Control Plant Improvements

The Bayshore Regional Sewerage Authority (BRSA) recently completed Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) improvements for several of the Authority's processes. One of these projects included the restoration and mitigation of various plant buildings and was paid for with approximately $1.6 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. This project qualified for principal forgiveness totaling $317,802 as it addressed damage from Superstorm Sandy and improved resilience for future storms. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $738,833 over the 20-year term of the loan or 44% of the project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 19 direct construction jobs.  

Improvements to the WPCP included the repair of damages resulting from Superstorm Sandy and mitigation measures to protect against wastewater service disruption in case of future coastal storms. 

Thomas Critelli, Mayor of Holmdel Township, declared the project a success: "As one of the communities served by the BRSA, Holmdel appreciates their service. They provide high level wastewater treatment service while actively pursuing process enhancements that improve efficiency and lower prices. This project is an example of the BRSA‘s commitment to  future stability, quality service and a clean environment. " 

This project was designed by R3M Engineering and constructed by Shorelands Construction, Inc.  

Picture courtesy of Bayshore RSA.

Published 6/27/2018.

Jersey City Drinking Water Project

Jersey City MUA Water Valve Replacement

The Jersey City Municipal Utilities Authority (JCMUA) recently completed a drinking water project that is being funded with approximately $5.7 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $993,849 over the 20-year term of the loan or 17% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 68 direct construction jobs. 

The JCMUA's water distribution system contains approximately 441 large valves that are critical to maintaining reliable system operation and isolating portions of the system in response to water main breaks. Many of the larger valves in Jersey City are old and either don't fully close or cannot be operated. The JCMUA has introduced a multi-year program to replace defective large valves. This project entailed the identification and replacement of 30 of the most defective valves.  

"It's not difficult to see how this project contributes to operational efficiency," noted Steven Fulop, Mayor of Jersey City. "It may not be as obvious that replacing defective valves is an example of the JCMUA working to protect the environment and public health at the most cost-effective prices. This project will help to save our most precious resource and save our community money in the long run." 

This project was designed and managed by CME Associates and installed by the Shauger Group. 

Picture courtesy of CME Associates.

Published 6/19/2018.

Burlington Township Clean Water Project

Burlington Township Sanitary Sewer Main Rehabilitation

The Township of Burlington recently completed the rehabilitation of sanitary sewer mains that is being funded with approximately $704,700 in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $160,430, over the 20-year term of the loan or 22% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 8 direct construction jobs.  

A TV inspection of the sanitary sewers revealed advanced deterioration of the existing asbestos cement pipes. The rehabilitation work consisted of using a trenchless technology to line the existing mains with cured-in-place pipe lining (CIPP). In addition, 261 leaking sewer laterals will be sealed at the connection using a chemical grout and approximately 50 manholes have been repaired with an interior application of an epoxy coating. 

According to Mayor Brian Carlin, the project benefits the community: "Burlington Township continues to take advantage of the significant cost savings afforded to its residents by participating in the funding programs being offered by the New Jersey Infrastructure Bank. As its name suggests, the Bank provides funding for infrastructure projects such as our ongoing sanitary sewer rehabilitation program at very attractive interest rates. Through this program Burlington Township has rehabilitated approximately 20 miles of aging asbestos cement pipes and hundreds of manholes. Burlington Township takes great pride in maintaining its water and sewer utilities.  The Township endeavors to maintain its utilities in optimum operating condition and efficiently providing these services to our residents at the lowest affordable rates.  The NJ Infrastructure Bank has played and continues to play a significant role in these efforts." 

The project was designed by the in-house staff of the  Burlington Township Engineering Department and built by All State Power Vac, Inc. 

Pictures courtesy of the Burlington Township Department

Published 6/12/201

Roosevelt Borough Drinking Water Project

Roosevelt Borough Drinking Water Treatment Plant Improvements

Roosevelt Borough completed wastewater treatment plant improvements that are being funded with approximately $814,178 in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $144,165, over the 20-year term of the loan or 22% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 10 direct construction jobs.  

The Borough-owned Water Treatment Plant was built nearly 80 years ago and has remained unchanged since its original construction. The deteriorated plant required a complete upgrade to ensure that the treatment process met all current drinking water standards. The project was difficult because of its location and isolation from outside water distribution sources. Improvements to the water plant were staged to be able to maintain normal treatment processes throughout the project. This required the removal of part of the roof to remove and install one filter at a time. New water filters were installed with green sand which drastically decreased the level of iron and manganese in the treated water thus eliminating the staining of clothing, sinks and bathroom fixtures throughout the Borough. The upgrades also included improvements to the sedimentation tank which was accumulating iron from the aerator tower. The piping between the two structures was caked with iron and the restriction of flow was causing operational and maintenance problems for the well and treatment equipment. A new sludge pump was installed to eliminate the buildup in the sedimentation tank. The water distribution system was improved by cleaning and lining additional footage and installing a 6-inch gate valve at the water treatment plant and at well number three.  

According to Peggy Malking, Mayor of Roosevelt Borough "Our water and sewer service is dedicated to providing our community with high quality drinking water. This project is an example of their diligence in maintaining  our assets for cost-effective operations and saving our rate payers money in the long run."  

This project was designed by Roberts Engineering Group, LLC and subcontracted by B&H Contracting, Inc. and Dilworth & Paxon, LLC. 

Pictures courtesy of Roberts Engineering Group, LLC

Published 6/4/2018

Stone Harbor Borough Clean Water Project

Stone Harbor Borough Sewer Rehabilitation

The Borough of Stone Harbor recently completed a sewer system rehabilitation that is being funded with approximately $4.5 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $1 million, over the 20-year term of the loan or 24% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 54 direct construction jobs.  

The proposed project included the installation of almost 2,000 linear feet of sanitary sewers and lateral services, approximately 1,950 linear feet of storm drainage pipes and all associated appurtenances. This project replaces failing portions of the sanitary sewer, therefore promoting water quality in the Borough. Three beach outfalls that had directly discharged into the Atlantic Ocean with no pre-treatment were removed and the affected areas restored. Stormwater treatment structures were installed at the outfall locations to pre-treat run-off and convey it to the bay side for discharge. 

According to Judith Davies-Dunhour, Mayor of Stone Harbor, "The Borough is dedicated to exceptional wastewater treatment which is critical to keeping our water resources clean. This project is a great example of our water and sewer department striving to maintain our assets to protect the environment and public health while saving our ratepayers money over time." 

This project was designed by Remington Vernick & Walberg Engineers. Subcontracting work was performed by Asphalt Paving Systems, Inc.  

Pictures courtesy of Remington Vernick & Walberg Engineers

Published 5/29/2018

Middlesex Water Company Drinking Water Project

Middlesex Water Company Watermain, Booster Pump Station and Meter Replacement

The Middlesex Water Company recently completed water quality improvements that are being funded with approximately $15.2 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB (formerly the NJEIT). Total savings for this project are estimated to be $6.4 million over the 30-year term of the loan or 42% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 182 direct construction jobs.  

The project included the removal of the original underground Booster Pump Station (BPS) and the construction of an above ground building to house the replacement BPS and SCADA/chlorination station. The original underground BPS was replaced with a new 6-million gallon/day duplex pump station. Additional components of the project included the installation of a permanent emergency power source, new tablet type chlorinators, and improved SCADA Panels. Water mains were replaced throughout the service area to address reduced pressure and flow volume due to corrosion and the accumulation of iron oxide. In addition, 373 residential meters were installed. 

According to Anthony Anesh, Mayor of the Borough of South Plainfield, "The Middlesex Water Company works to meet the changing needs of their customers, property owners, developers and municipalities. They have built a well-deserved reputation for delivering sound technical and full-service solutions to deliver a wide range of services. This project reflects a commitment to efficiency which benefits their ratepayers by saving them money over time." 

This project was designed by Mott MacDonald with Subcontract construction by J. Fletcher Creamer & Son, Inc., Schilke Construction, J.F. Kiely Construction Company and Raritan Pipe Supply.  

Pictures courtesy of Middlesex Water Company.

Published 5/16/2018

Bordentown City Well Replacement

Bordentown City Well Replacement

The City of Bordentown recently completed a drinking water project that is being funded with approximately $1.2 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $272,293, over the 20-year term of the loan or 22% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 13 direct construction jobs.  

The City reduced the radium level in its potable water supply by replacing existing Well No. 2 with Well No. 2A. The project included drilling the new replacement well, installation of permanent pumping equipment, the construction of a masonry well house and associated conveyance piping.  

James Lynch, Mayor of Bordentown commends the project. "We as a governing body see no local issue more important then the quality of our drinking water as it affects each and every one of us every day. Our City water department provides our citizens with a dependable supply of high-quality drinking water at the lowest possible cost to our rate payers." Lynch went on to say "This project is an example of our water department's commitment to improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources.  

This project was designed by Remington, Vernick and Arango, and constructed by Tkt Construction Inc., with sub-contracting by Tortorice Contracting, Abs Electric, Inc., AC Schultes, Inc. and Dandrea Masonry.  

Pictures courtesy of Remington, Vernick & Arango

Published 4/9/208

Pine Hill MUA Clean Water Project

Pine Hill MUA Wastewater Treatment Plant Improvements

The Pine Hill Municipal Utilities Authority (Authority) recently completed wastewater treatment plant improvements that are being funded with approximately $1.2 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $383,266, over the 20-year term of the loan or 30% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 14 direct construction jobs.  

Improvements included the demolition of the 45-year-old dry pump station and its replacement with a new submersible pump station. The project also included the installation of a new 6-inch force main connection to the recently installed CCMUA interceptor line and a sanitary sewer extension. By replacing deteriorated equipment and connecting the sanitary sewer line to the CCMUA for treatment, this project reduces the Authority's cost to maintain a two-mile force main and the increasing cost of sending wastewater through a neighboring town.  

Christopher Green, Mayor of Pine Hill Borough, commended the Authority, stating that "the Authority is dedicated to extending the life of their assets to efficiently convey wastewater for treatment while saving their ratepayers money in the long run through the Water Bank's low-interest loans." 

This project was designed by Pennoni Associates and constructed by Level-1 Construction and Centerpoint Associates, Inc. 

Pictures courtesy of Pennoni Associates

Published 3/20/2018

City of Hoboken Clean Water Project

City of Hoboken Southwest Park CSO Green Infrastructure Project

The City of Hoboken  completed a green infrastructure project that was funded with approximately $5.1 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Because this project addressed combined sewer overflow issues with green infrastructure, this project qualified for $1 Million in principal forgiveness. Total savings for this project including interest cost savings are estimated to be $2,021,833 over the 20-year term of the loan or 40% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 61 direct construction jobs.  

The Southwest Park is a one-acre plot that was designed to capture 200,000 gallons of stormwater runoff while providing green space for the neighborhood. Southwest Park serves as a small-scale model for integrating green infrastructure and underground retention to reduce flooding. Hoboken's combined sewer system (CSS) collects both sanitary and stormwater flows, diminishing water quality and leading to flooding. The stormwater design combines passive rainwater collection with permeable pavement rain gardens and bioswales with subsurface storage beneath the park.  All of the pavement within the park is permeable so that the first rainfall is absorbed within the pavement. Subterranean storage chambers located in the zone between the park pavement and the water table collect overflow from the rain garden and any drain inlets within the park. The stored rainwater is then slowly released to reduce the peak flow to the City's sewer system and keep the CSS from overflowing.  

Picture courtesy of Hoboken City.

Published 2/27/2018

Ravi Bhalla, Mayor of the City of Hoboken, applauded former Mayor, Dawn Zimmer for the initiation of the project which addresses flooding issues in the City. "I'd also like to acknowledge the City Council for their continuous support of the project and North Hudson Sewerage Authority for partnering with the City to design this park so that it reduces flooding. The park represents an ideal opportunity to combine green infrastructure and water retention with the creation of a public open space."  

This project was designed by Suburban Consultants and built by Flanagan Contracting Group.

Long Beach Township Drinking Water Project

Long Beach Pump Room Reconstruction

The Township of Long Beach recently completed a drinking water project that is being funded with approximately $7.1 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ Infrastructure Bank (formerly the NJEIT). Total savings for this project are estimated to be $2,291,943 over the 30-year term of the loan or 32% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 85 direct construction jobs.  

The original 50-year-old pump room was flooded and damaged with salt water during Superstorm Sandy compromising the electrical equipment. The project included the demolition and reconstruction of the existing water pump room as well as associated components. The new building was constructed in accordance with FEMA flood zone regulations. 

This project also increased the Township's pumping capacity to address population growth since the original pump room was constructed. According to Joseph Mancini, Mayor of Long Beach Township, "This project  will make  an immediate and noticeable difference  to our residents. In the long term, it reflects effective asset management which will reduce our operating costs and save money for our residents over time."  

This project was designed by Owen Little & Associates and Constructed by Quad Construction. 

Pictures courtesy of Owen Little & Associates

Published 2/13/2018

Camden County MUA Clean Water Project

Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority Strives for Net Zero Energy Use by 2020

The Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority (CCMUA) www.ccmua.org. is well known for its initiatives to incorporate green and grey Infrastructure improvements into its system as well as financing these improvements through the New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Financial Program (NJEIFP), a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJEIT.  With the savings from the NJEIFP's low-cost financing, the CCMUA has been able to afford and construct more capital infrastructure projects and, as a result, is moving closer towards achieving its goal of becoming 100% energy self-sufficient by 2020. For this effort, the CCMUA has gained recognition as a "Net Zero Hero" by the US EPA. For more information on EPA's Net Zero initiative, visit https://www.epa.gov/water-research/promoting-sustainability-through-net-zero-strategies. 

**Components of the CCMUA's Net Zero Program: **

I. ENERGY REDUCTION: In an effort to become more energy efficient, the CCMUA has undertaken a number of critical projects in recent years to reduce the amount of energy required to run its operations:  
a. Sedimentation Tank Upgrades: By optimizing the primary stage of the treatment process through natural gravity, the CCMUA was able to remove a greater volume of solids and thereby rely less on the energy-intensive pure oxygen aeration system. This component of the project was funded with $10 million in low-cost funds from the NJEIFP and significantly reduced energy usage in the secondary treatment stage. 

b. Aeration System Upgrades: Significant upgrades to the aeration system enhanced efficiency in the secondary treatment process and further reduced CCMUA's energy usage. This component of the project was funded with $15 million in low-cost funds from the NJEIFP and, with the sedimentation tank upgrades, collectively reduced the CCMUA's energy consumption needs by approximately 25%. 

II. ENERGY PRODUCTION: With a lower energy load, the CCMUA has focused on implementing the following alternative energy projects to lessen its dependency on outside energy providers: 
a. Solar Panel Array: CCMUA has completed the installation of a 7,200-panel solar array which will generate approximately 10% of the CCMUA's energy needs. The projected savings are approximately $300,000 in energy costs during the first year of the project and approximately $7 million over the life of the 15-year power purchase agreement with their contractor, Heliosage. The CCMUA will not be responsible for capital costs or ongoing maintenance costs but will instead be paying a monthly solar power bill at rates well below prevailing utility rates. For perspective, the 1.8 MWs of clean, renewable energy produced by the solar array provides enough electricity to cover over 1,100  homes per year. 

b. Sludge Digester and Combined Heat & Power: CCMUA is in the planning phase to construct a sludge digester which will reduce the amount of sludge generated at the plant by 50% and dramatically reduce odor emissions. 50% of the sludge will be digested and converted into biogas. A planned Combined Heat & Power facility (CHP) will then convert the biogas into electricity. The remaining 50% will then go through the sludge drying facility which will also be financed through NJEIFP. The CHP project has been designed and is in the process of being bid for contract. It is estimated that this project will generate enough biogas and subsequent electricity to produce between 50-60% of the energy needed to run the plant, render the plant more resilient, and significantly reduce its carbon footprint. This project will also be funded with a $31.5 million low-cost loan from the NJEIFP.  
 

c. Sustainability Loop: The CCMUA is constructing a Sustainability Loop wherein treated effluent will be transferred to a "Trash-to-Steam" incinerator for use as cooling water, and the incinerator will send electricity generated from trash to the CCMUA. The effluent will replace one million gallons of groundwater per day that would otherwise be withdrawn for use by the incinerator from a critical water supply area. The project has been conceptually approved by the NJ Board of Public Utilities (BPU) and the CCMUA has received a planning grant in the amount of $150,000 from the BPU to help implement the electricity component. The sustainability loop project is expected to provide approximately 30% of CCMUA's energy needs. 

According to Andy Kricun, Executive Director of the CCMUA, "Wastewater utilities have an important mission to protect the public health and to protect waterways from pollution. In the face of increasingly severe storms, like Sandy and Harvey, and the corresponding increased risk of power outages, wastewater plants can reduce their vulnerability to power outages by implementing green energy initiatives. In addition, green energy initiatives reduce a wastewater treatment plant's carbon footprint so our industry does its part to combat global warming and climate change when we adopt green energy alternatives. The CCMUA is committed to being 100% off the grid and 100% green energy by 2020 through implementation of energy conservation, solar power and electricity from bio-solids and solid waste."  

The CCMUA, through this initiative, deserves the US EPA's recognition as a leader of innovative energy efficiency policies that can guide and inspire other Utility Authorities to consider working toward similar goals.  

Picture courtesy of CCMUA.

Published 02/09/2018