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Projects

Learn about Projects for New Jersey Infrastructure Bank, including Cape May City Well Replacement, Hightstown Borough Ultraviolet Disinfection System, and City of Newark Queen Ditch Restoration Project.

Cape May City Well Replacement

Community Receives $1,687,303 in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $671,184.

February-19-2019

The City of Cape May recently completed drinking water improvements that are being funded with approximately $1.7 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $671,184 over the 30-year term of the loan or 40% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 20 direct construction jobs.

The project included the drilling of new Well No. 8 which will act as a back-up supply to the City’s existing water treatment plant. Permanent pumping equipment was installed, and the existing well house was demolished and replaced with a larger one. The well was designed to produce approximately 1,000 gallons per minute of brackish water which was connected onsite to the existing Well No. 7 transmission main and conveyed to the City’s treatment plant.

Cape May City’s Mayor, Clarence F. Lear III, applauded the project stating “We are proud of our Reverse Osmosis Water treatment Facility which removes salt from our water wells to produce potable drinking water. We remain committed to investing in our utility infrastructure. The service we provide is essential to public health, fire protection, quality of life and economic growth in our community which includes the City of Cape May, the Boroughs of West Cape May and Cape May Point and the US Coast Guard Training Center. In addition to enhancing the integrity of our service, these upgrades contribute to the overall efficiency of our water distribution system and the economic vitality of our community by passing the savings earned through the NJ Water Bank on to our rate payers.”

This project was designed by Remington Vernick & Walberg Engineers and constructed by Marino, Industrial Systems & Services.

Hightstown Borough Ultraviolet Disinfection System

Community receives $1.3 Million in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated savings to rate payers of $526,545.

February-11-2019

The Borough of Hightstown recently completed wastewater treatment plant improvements that are being funded with approximately $1.3 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $526,545 over the 30-year term of the loan or 40% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 15 direct construction jobs.

The project replaced the Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant’s (AWWTP) existing chlorination, dichlorination, and sand filter systems with new state-of-the-art Ultra Violet (UV) Disinfection and Disk Filter systems in half the space.

The project removed and replaced two large sand filters with two UV disinfection units and two disk filters within the same footprint. The installation of two units for each process ensures constant disinfection of wastewater when one unit requires maintenance. The new disk filters and UV Disinfection system are easier to maintain and eliminate the need for hazardous chemicals such as chlorine. The replacement of the chlorine disinfection system with UV eliminated the discharge of chlorine produced oxidants (CPOs), specifically high levels of Bromodichloromethane. The elimination of chlorine gas and sodium hydroxide creates a safer work environment and a healthier effluent for plant and wildlife in Rocky Brook into which the AWWTP ultimately discharges.

The new Disk Filters and UV Disinfection systems are also more reliable for ensuring safe effluent quality, easier to operate and maintain, and more efficient in the process. The project received a second-place award for the Project of the Year from the NJ Society of Municipal Engineers (NJSME) for work designed for a municipality with a population under 20,000.

Lawrence D. Quattrone, Mayor of Hightstown Borough, declared the project a success. “Our water department is dedicated to managing our wastewater and reducing risks to public health. The UV disinfection system represents an excellent upgrade to our system as it kills bacteria, viruses and yeasts without impairing the taste or odor of the water. This project is a great example of our water department implementing best practices at the lowest prices which we can pass on to our residents.”

This project was designed by Roberts Engineering Group and constructed by Quad Construction.

City of Newark Queen Ditch Restoration Project

Community Receives $6 Million in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated savings to rate payers of $5.7 million.

February-5-2019

The City of Newark recently completed green infrastructure improvements that are being funded with approximately $6 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-interest funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. This project qualified for principal forgiveness totaling $2,646,039 as it addressed CSO overflows in Newark and improved resilience for future storms. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $5,737,269 over the 20-year term of the loan or 95% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 72 direct construction jobs.

Drivers in the City of Newark have become accustomed to flooding in certain areas during rain events causing recurring property damage and, in some instances, leaving motorists stranded. In an effort to reduce the frequency and magnitude of local street flooding, the City upgraded and improved drainage facilities in the the Queen Ditch section of the City. The project included the installation of a precast concrete box culvert and the installation of a netting facility that prevents street debris and litter from entering the City’s waterways. The project also included dredging the Queen Ditch to its original depth and restoring an important wetland habitat in the center of a highly developed industrial area. An in-line floatables collection system was also constructed as well as a headwall with a tide gate, and a stone scour pad.

According to Newark Mayor Ras J. Baraka, “This project eliminates the blockage of the main outlet sewer from the Queen District diversion chamber. In addition, it restricts the overflow of combined sewage during wet weather periods that result in frequent surface flooding. This investment is an example of our collaboration with the State of New Jersey to solve flooding issues, protect public health, and benefit our taxpayers through the money they will save over time.”

This project was designed by CDM Smith and constructed by Rencor Construction Service, Ltd.

Jersey City MUA Green Infrastructure Project

Community receives $6.7 Million in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated savings to rate payers of $3,431,821.

January-30-2019

The Jersey City Municipal Utilities Authority (JCMUA) recently completed stormwater improvements that are being funded with approximately $6.6 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. This project qualified for principal forgiveness totaling $1,328,974 as it addressed damage from Superstorm Sandy and improved resilience for future storms. Another component of the project addressed CSO issues with green infrastructure, qualifying for additional principal forgiveness funds. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project is estimated to be $3.4 million, over the 20-year term of the loan or 51% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 79 direct construction jobs.

The project included the installation of emergency generators at the east and west side pump stations, their connection to the electrical systems, concrete foundations, storm drains, water main and hydrants, paving, and removal of oil storage tanks. The green infrastructure portion of the project included the replacement of deteriorating sidewalk with pervious sidewalks to recharge groundwater. Two existing downspouts were directed into six pre-cast downspout planter boxes equipped with perforated underdrains that discharge to approximately 1,760 square feet of pervious concrete sidewalk that intercept, treat and filter stormwater runoff from the rooftop. Approximately 8,540 square feet of porous asphalt parking spaces were installed to intercept, treat and filter stormwater runoff from the parking lot. Two rain gardens were installed in front of the JCMUA building to capture stormwater runoff from the adjacent parking lot. Three rain gardens were installed along NJ Route 440 to intercept, treat and filter stormwater runoff from part of the roadway.

Steven M. Fulop, Mayor of Jersey City applauded the project noting, “This is a smart project. For very little money, we have diverted water from our combined sewer system with green engineering techniques and qualified for principal forgiveness in the process. The result is reduced stormwater overflow, improved resiliency and savings of over 50% in the long run. This project is an excellent example of our commitment to better manage our waste water, improve resiliency in case of future storms and reduce risks to public health and the environment. This project accomplished all that at an affordable price that will save our rate payers money over time.”

This project was designed by Remington Vernick Engineers and the Rutgers Cooperative Extension Water Resource Program. It was constructed by Carbo Constructors Corp. and Montana Construction Corps, Inc.

Gloucester County Utilities Authority Wastewater Treatment Plant Improvements

Authority Receives $41.6 Million in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated savings to rate payers of $20,695,995.

January-22-2019

The Gloucester County Utilities Authority (GCUA)recently completed stormwater improvements that are being funded with approximately $41.6 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $20.6 million over the 30-year term of the loan or 50% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 499 direct construction jobs.

The bio-solids handling facility converted the sludge handling process from sludge incineration to anaerobic digestion with combined heat and power generation. The project included the construction of an anaerobic digester, an egg-shaped digester, and a digested sludge storage tank. The existing grit removal system was replaced and the tanks were modified to accommodate the new equipment. The project also included the installation of clarifier equipment, an algae sweep system and upgrades to the GCUA’s aeration system blowers which reduce energy consumption and perform more reliably with consistent dissolved oxygen control. As a result, the blowers mitigate potential upsets in the facility’s biological process.

Robert M. Damminger, Freeholder of Gloucester County, commended the project, noting “This is a large project and a valuable undertaking for all of the 16 municipalities served by the GCUA. The generation of combined heat and power, in addition to other wastewater plant improvements, will enhance energy efficiency to better support the anaerobic digestion process. This project will greatly benefit our rate payers by providing efficient service and financial savings over time.”

Paul Medany, Mayor of Deptford Township, one of the utility’s customers, added “Using the byproducts of the GCUA to provide green energy for our citizens is a solution that is both environmentally friendly and cost effective, a big win for all of us.”

This project was designed by Remington Vernick Engineers and constructed by CBI Services, Clyde N. Lattimer & Sons, and Pact Two, LLC.

Atlantic County UA Resiliency Project

Authority Receives $4,852,159 in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $2,877,359.

January-17-2019

The Atlantic County Utilities Authority recently completed resiliency improvements that are being funded with approximately $4.8 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. This project qualified for principal forgiveness totaling $1,213,040 as it addressed damage from Superstorm Sandy and improved resilience for future storms. In addition, this project qualified for Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR) funds. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project is estimated to be $2,877,359 million over the 20-year term of the loan or 59% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 58 direct construction jobs.

The project provides necessary energy power upgrades and adds resiliency to address deficiencies brought on by Superstorm Sandy. Upgrades include a roll-off truck with a roll-off skid mounted diesel refueling system, emergency power installations, portable diesel power module generators, six trailer mounted portable pumps and the replacement of a 15,000-gallon storage tank. In addition, a permanent sump was constructed within the facility for emptying stormwater from the building.

According to Frank Gilliam, Mayor of Atlantic City, one of the Utility’s major customers, “The ACUA used their expertise to improve resiliency in case of future storms which benefits all of the municipalities within their service area. This project will provide enhanced quality of life for our residents combined with smart money management reflected by the astounding 60% savings of the total project costs. This project, funded through the Water Bank, is an excellent example of how communities can implement water infrastructure improvements and save money in the long run.“

The project was designed by ACUA in-house staff and constructed by Phillips Brothers Electrical and TTI Environmental.

Hillsborough Sewer Extension

Community Receives $1,152,723 in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $323,455.

January-8-2019

Hillsborough Township recently completed stormwater improvements that are being funded with approximately $1.2 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $323,455 over the 20-year term of the loan or 28% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 14 direct construction jobs.

The project included the construction of approximately 3,400 linear feet (LF) of 8-inch diameter sanitary sewer, 750 LF of 1 ½ inch polyethylene force main, 16 manholes, as well as a number of stormwater inlets and laterals to serve existing homes from where the wastewater is conveyed to the Somerset Raritan Valley Sewerage Authority (SRVSA) for treatment. The provision of a sanitary sewer collection and conveyance system to these homes, alleviated previously malfunctioning septic systems.

Gloria McCauley, Mayor of Hillsborough Township commended the project noting, “This project is an example of our commitment to better manage our waste water, reducing risks to public health and the environment. This project accomplished all that at an affordable price that will save our rate payers money over time.”

This project was designed by Maser Consulting and constructed by OTS NJ.

Carteret Stormwater Efficiency Project

Community Receives $13.2 Million in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $7.8 million.

The Borough of Carteret recently completed stormwater efficiency improvements that are being funded with a combination of State and Federal financing. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) provided a $1.04 million grant for Open Space acquisition through its Green Acres Program. The stormwater management components of the project are being funded with approximately $13.2 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank. Several components of this project qualified for principal forgiveness totaling $2.48 million as they addressed damage from Superstorm Sandy and improved resilience for future storms. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $7.8 million over the 30-year term of the loan or close to 60% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 146 direct construction jobs.

Rahway City WTP Filter System Upgrade

Community Receives $12.9 Million in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $3,967,158

The City of Rahway recently completed stormwater improvements that are being funded with approximately $12.9 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $4 million over the 23-year term of the loan or 30% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 154 direct construction jobs.

The project consisted of improvements to the City’s water treatment plant and construction of a new interconnection and pipeline with Middlesex Water Company. The system’s existing gravity filters were replaced with a membrane treatment system and housed in a new treatment building. The project also included the construction of approximately 1,610 linear feet of new piping, and a new, pre-fabricated sanitary pump station consisting of two submersible pumps. The liner for the onsite residual holding pond was removed and replaced with a new HDPE liner and the SCADA system was upgraded.

NJ American Water Flood Gate Replacement and Stabilization

Company Receives $27,201,503 in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $14,864,529.

NJ American Water recently completed stormwater improvements to the Raritan Millstone Water Treatment Plant (RMWTP) that are being funded with approximately $27.2 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. This project qualified for the maximum amount of principal forgiveness, totaling $2,121,919 as it addressed damage from previous storms and improved resilience for future storms. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project is estimated to be $14.8 million over the 30-year term of the loan or 55% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 326 direct construction jobs.

Clinton Town New Water Treatment Facility

Community Receives $1,742,451 in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $690,355.

The Town of Clinton recently constructed a new water treatment facility with approximately $1.7 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $661,848, over the 30-year term of the loan or 40% of the total project construction cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 20 direct construction jobs.

The chamber and below-grade treatment equipment containing Well #4 were replaced with a single story water treatment facility at the existing Deer Hill Road Location. As this site is in the floodplain, the existing well casing was extended above flood elevation to meet resiliency requirements. Well #4 was furnished with a new submersible pump and a pitless adapter that discharges to the new treatment facility. The treatment facility included a videographic recorder, a well level indicator, remote communications for SCADA and a tablet chlorinator.

Saddle Brook Township Water Distribution Improvements

Community Receives $1,309,660 in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $327,603.

The Township of Saddle Brook recently completed drinking water distribution improvements that are being funded with approximately $1.3 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Total savings for this project, including interest cost savings, are estimated to be $327,603, over the 20-yeSaddle Brookar term of the loan or 25% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 15 direct construction jobs.

The project involved the replacement of approximately 3,477 linear feet of water mains ranging in size from 6-inches to 10-inches in diameter and 3,120 linear feet of associated service connections. The affected areas include Fifth, North Fifth, Sixth, Ninth and Capitol Streets; Hillside and Grace Avenues; Route 46; and Outwater and Rosol Lanes.

Ventnor City Bulk Head Replacements

Community Receives $1,311,000 in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $574,562.

Ventnor City recently completed a bulkhead replacement project that is being funded with approximately $1.3 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJIB. Several components of this project qualified for principal forgiveness totaling $246,624 as they addressed damage from Superstorm Sandy and improved resilience for future storms. Including interest cost savings, total savings for this project are estimated to be $574,562 over the 20-year term of the loan or 44% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 15 direct construction jobs.

The project included the replacement of sections of bulkheads throughout the City that were damaged due to Superstorm Sandy. The bulkheads were installed on Sacramento, Derby & Winchester Avenues, Lilly Park, Vassar Square and Ventnor Garden Plaza. The project was designed to protect public infrastructure and private investments from impacts caused by stormwater flooding and mitigate against future damage to streets, homes, water systems and other utilities. The project site is a well-established neighborhood that has endured frequent flooding and significant impacts from Superstorm Sandy.

Town of Hammonton Stormwater Improvements.

Community Receives $2,735,872 in Water Bank Loans.

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $661,848.

The Town of Hammonton recently completed stormwater improvements that are being funded with approximately $2.7 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project are estimated to be $661,848 over the 20-year term of the loan or 24% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 26 direct construction jobs.

The project area contained undersized and leaking water mains and house connections as well as sediment-laden and broken storm sewers that caused flooding at various intersections and contributed to the deterioration of inlet structures, sanitary sewer piping and manhole junctions.

Little Egg Harbor MUA Water Main Replacement

Authority Receives $2,183,781 in Water Bank Loans

Estimated Savings to rate payers of $886,747

The Little Egg Harbor Municipal Utilities Authority (LEHMUA) recently completed a water main replacement project that is being funded with $2.2 million in loans from the NJ Water Bank, a joint low-rate funding program of the DEP and the NJ I-Bank. Total savings for this project is estimated to be $886,747 over the 30-year term of the loan or 40% of the total project cost. In addition, this project created an estimated 25 direct construction jobs.

The project included the replacement of the existing aging water main along Twin Lakes Boulevard and a small section on Lake Champlain Drive. The project also included the installation of approximately 2.9 miles of new polyvinyl chloride (PVC) water main pipes, 22 fire hydrants, 200 water service connections and 62 gate valves. In addition, 38 new wet tap connections were installed.